Breewayy Warriors are the newest AAU junior basketball team in Louisville, created by activist Bruce Sweeney III.One dribble at a time, Coach Sweeney is not only enhancing the boys’ basketball skills, but their life skills. The team is comprised of more than a dozen sixth, seventh, and eighth graders from all over Louisville and promotes education, social justice, and provides a positive outlet away from the city’s gun increasing gun violence.Advertisement“I thought maybe it would ease the pain because ball is life,” said Coach Sweeney. “That’ s when I came up with the idea to get the kids off the street, get them jobs and in the basketball community.”Coach Sweeney’s involvement in the Breonna Taylor protests, including countless days at Jefferson Square Park, inspired his efforts to pour into youth.He brought basketball rims to the square, which was ground zero for justice for Taylor, and saw how it brought everyone together and eased the pain.“A lot of people came out to support it, so I said, ‘why not come up with a basketball team, Breewayy Warriors,” he said. “At the end of the day, the kids are the future and they need this. They need this more than anything in this world.”Through the team name and purple uniforms with Taylor’s face, they’re honoring the justice they’re still fighting for, while also honoring one of their own fallen teammates who was tragically killed in June.Demetri Rhodes,15, was shot to death in a residence in the Shawnee neighborhood on June 4, the same day the Breonna Taylor basketball court was unveiled at Lannan Park.“It was sad because I felt like I’ve saved him many of times and I felt like I couldn’t save him that time,” said Sweeney. “We don’t want to see that happen again, we really don’t.”The tragedy also impacted Rhodes’ teammates, who already use the sport as an escape from the violence.“Everybody comes to play basketball to get their mind off everything. Get their mind off the violence, keep them away from drugs, guns all of that,” said Bruce Sweeney III. “I was sad. I just know that it gives us a chance to work harder.”Other teammates use the violence as a lesson and wake up call to stay on the right path.“Anybody, it don’t matter what age you are, can get into trouble and that inspires me more to stay out of trouble,” said Tevin Tooley.As Louisville’s gun violence worsens, keeping the young players on the court and off the streets is the goal for the team, which Coach Sweeney is motivated by the team’s slogan to do… “Keep Going”.“I couldn’t tell you what else I’d be doing; this movement has changed my life and it’s made me a better man,” said Coach Sweeney. “Now, I hope that they become a better man, a better friend, and a better individual, just a better all-around person in life.”Breonna Taylor family is supportive of the team and the work that Coach Sweeney is doing in the community.The Breewayy Warriors have a basketball tournament on June 10 and 11 at MidAmerica Sports Center in Jeffersontown. They have asked the community to come out and support.

Breewayy Warriors are the newest AAU junior basketball team in Louisville, created by activist Bruce Sweeney III.

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One dribble at a time, Coach Sweeney is not only enhancing the boys’ basketball skills, but their life skills. The team is comprised of more than a dozen sixth, seventh, and eighth graders from all over Louisville and promotes education, social justice, and provides a positive outlet away from the city’s gun increasing gun violence.

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“I thought maybe it would ease the pain because ball is life,” said Coach Sweeney. “That’ s when I came up with the idea to get the kids off the street, get them jobs and in the basketball community.”

Coach Sweeney’s involvement in the Breonna Taylor protests, including countless days at Jefferson Square Park, inspired his efforts to pour into youth.

He brought basketball rims to the square, which was ground zero for justice for Taylor, and saw how it brought everyone together and eased the pain.

“A lot of people came out to support it, so I said, ‘why not come up with a basketball team, Breewayy Warriors,” he said. “At the end of the day, the kids are the future and they need this. They need this more than anything in this world.”

Through the team name and purple uniforms with Taylor’s face, they’re honoring the justice they’re still fighting for, while also honoring one of their own fallen teammates who was tragically killed in June.

Demetri Rhodes,15, was shot to death in a residence in the Shawnee neighborhood on June 4, the same day the Breonna Taylor basketball court was unveiled at Lannan Park.

“It was sad because I felt like I’ve saved him many of times and I felt like I couldn’t save him that time,” said Sweeney. “We don’t want to see that happen again, we really don’t.”

The tragedy also impacted Rhodes’ teammates, who already use the sport as an escape from the violence.

“Everybody comes to play basketball to get their mind off everything. Get their mind off the violence, keep them away from drugs, guns all of that,” said Bruce Sweeney III. “I was sad. I just know that it gives us a chance to work harder.”

Other teammates use the violence as a lesson and wake up call to stay on the right path.

“Anybody, it don’t matter what age you are, can get into trouble and that inspires me more to stay out of trouble,” said Tevin Tooley.

As Louisville’s gun violence worsens, keeping the young players on the court and off the streets is the goal for the team, which Coach Sweeney is motivated by the team’s slogan to do… “Keep Going”.

“I couldn’t tell you what else I’d be doing; this movement has changed my life and it’s made me a better man,” said Coach Sweeney. “Now, I hope that they become a better man, a better friend, and a better individual, just a better all-around person in life.”

Breonna Taylor family is supportive of the team and the work that Coach Sweeney is doing in the community.

The Breewayy Warriors have a basketball tournament on June 10 and 11 at MidAmerica Sports Center in Jeffersontown. They have asked the community to come out and support.

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