Children younger than 5 have between 10 and 100 times more genetic material from the novel coronavirus in their noses compared to older children and to adults, according to a small study published Thursday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.While the study didn’t measure transmissibility, it raises questions — just as schools start to reopen — about how easily the new coronavirus may be spread by the under-5 set.”We had just noticed that some of the children that we were testing for SARS CoV-2 that were positive, the youngest children seemed to have a high amount of the viral nucleic acid — a high viral load in their nose — compared to some of our older children and adults,” lead author Dr. Taylor Heald-Sargent, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, told CNN. “And so when we … actually ran the numbers, controlled for a few things, we found that there was actually a statistically significant higher amount of the genes that are encoded by SARS, which usually correlates to more virus, in the nose of children less than five years old, compared to older children and adults.”Heald-Sargent and her team analyzed 145 swab samples collected from patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 within a week of symptom onset; 46 of them were from children under 5, 51 were from 5- to 17-year-olds, and 48 were from adults between 18 and 65. The samples were collected between the end of March and the end of April from various inpatient, outpatient, emergency department and drive-through testing sites at a pediatric tertiary medical center in Chicago.They found that those under 5 had a statistically significant greater amount of virus particles in the nose correlating to “a 10-fold to 100-fold greater amount of the coronavirus in the upper respiratory tract … ” the researchers wrote in their paper.The latest numbersMore than 4.4 million cases of the virus and 151,000 deaths have been reported in the US, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.Resurgence now moving to Midwest, expert saysThe resurgence in coronavirus infections that has rocked the U.S. South and West is now making its way to Midwestern states.”What inevitably is going to happen is that the states that are not yet in trouble, will likely get into trouble,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Wednesday in an interview on MSNBC.States including Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee are seeing an increase in the percentage of coronavirus tests coming back positive, he said, a development that preceded the spike in the South and West.The White House coronavirus task force has warned Midwestern governors that the time to get ahead of the curve is now before the numbers start to skyrocket in their states, Fauci said.”Before you know it, two to three weeks down the pike, you’re in trouble,” he said.Already, West Virginia is watching coronavirus migrate from the South daily, West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice said. The state has lost five more people to the virus since Monday, bringing the total to more than 1,100 people.”It’s just not good. That’s just all there is to it,” Justice said. Where western and southern states stand nowStates across the West and South have set records for daily cases and deaths this month as the virus has surged.California set a grim record of 197 deaths in a single day, the California Department of Public Health reported Wednesday. The last record for the state was set just the week before at 159.Los Angeles County also saw its highest COVID-19 death toll to date with 91 deaths, bringing the total in the county to 4,516. But the county’s Health Director Barbara Ferrer warned that some of Wednesday’s fatalities are also attributed to a reporting backlog. Also setting a record for coronavirus deaths in one day, Florida reported 216 deaths Wednesday. The state has been at the forefront of the resurgence in coronavirus cases.Texas cases surpass New York Coronavirus cases in Texas have risen to more than 418,00, putting the state at a higher case count than New York.Once the U.S. epicenter of the pandemic, New York now ranks fourth in total case count behind California, Florida and Texas, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.Medical teams on the frontlines in Texas said that spikes in the state have taken a toll.”It’s very hard. We’re seeing entire families in our communities ravaged by the virus,” said Dr. Martin Schwartz, who treats patients in intensive care units. “A lot of deaths inside one single family. It’s terrible.”The main hotspot in the state has been the Rio Grande Valley, where hospitals began reaching capacity earlier this month.Health officials say the pandemic is wreaking havoc on communities in Hidalgo County.”It’s a tsunami what we’re seeing right now,” said Dr. Federico Vallejo, a critical care pulmonologist. He told CNN last week that he is treating up to 70 patients a day compared to the usual 15 to 20 a critical care doctor sees during a rotation.Texas was one of the first states to reopen in May, but Gov. Greg Abbott announced a pause to any further reopening in June when cases surged. Now Texas is one of the 41 states to implement mask requirements in some form to protect against the virus’s spread.Though many health experts stress the importance of wearing masks to protect against the spread of the virus, their use has been under debate in the public.Texas Republican Louie Gohmert, who has frequently refused to wear a mask, has tested positive for the virus. Gohmert told KETK on Wednesday he may have contracted coronavirus by incorrectly wearing his mask.”I can’t help but think that if I hadn’t been wearing a mask so much in the last 10 days or so, I really wonder if I would have gotten it,” Gohmert added. “You know, moving the mask around, getting it just right, we’re bound to put some virus on the mask that I sucked in. That’s most likely what happened.”While wearing a mask incorrectly can expose a person to the virus, experts say it primarily spreads person to person. Florida sheriff issues more than 200 citations for gatherings Florida’s Broward County sheriff says he’s got no plans to end an operation cracking down on large gatherings, which has already resulted in more than 200 citations.The operation’s goals were two-fold, Sheriff Gregory Tony said in a virtual news conference Wednesday: to reduce the large gatherings that were taking place and to crack down on “roving car clubs” that were bringing dozens of young people together throughout certain parts of the community.There have been more than 1,100 calls of service about parties and social gatherings, the sheriff said.In the two weeks since the operation was launched, Tony says police have responded to at least 13 different gatherings or parties and issued more than 260 different citations.”Anytime we’re having large gatherings of 100, 150 plus people, it’s crystal clear that we’re not seeing a compliance with the CDC recommendations and therefore more people will contract this virus,” the sheriff said.”We have no interest at this point in time to discontinue having this type of enforcement operation,” he said.Broward County borders Miami-Dade County, which has been called by some experts the country’s new coronavirus epicenter, with overwhelmed hospitals and maxed out ICUs sounding the alarm over the rise in patients. And in the last week, sick Floridians seeking treatment in Miami-Dade County spilled over to the neighboring county’s hospitals.And across the state, the daily number of coronavirus-related deaths broke a record Wednesday for the second day in a row.During his news conference, the sheriff urged the use of face masks, asking residents in the community to take a “common sense approach.””It’s not about the individual person anymore,” Tony said. “When you don’t wear a mask when you don’t comply, you are potentially exposing someone else. So it’s not simply about what you can do for yourself as well what you can do for other people that you don’t even know.”He said several businesses who weren’t following coronavirus guidelines were shut down for at least a day or fined.”We do need to get better compliance out of our community, they need to take on a greater deal of social responsibility. If not, we will be out there enforcing, citing, and writing notices,” the sheriff said.Restart needed to get the fight against the virus back on track, experts sayHealth experts are urging federal, state and local leaders to come up with policy actions to get control of the pandemic.Scholars at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security said in a report that the U.S. needs to restart its response to the virus.”Unlike many countries in the world, the United States is not currently on course to get control of this epidemic,” the report says. “It is time to reset.”The report includes 10 recommendations that include universal mask mandates, federal leadership to improve testing and, in places where rates of transmission are worsening, stay-at-home orders.Though some have called for another shut down, Fauci said the better option might be to scale back reopenings and move forward more cautiously from there.”If you’re going to quickly call a pause, a timeout and think maybe you want to backtrack a little, not necessarily all the way back to shut down, but enough to regain your footing, so that you then proceed to open in a much more cautious fashion,” he said.Stop the spread of COVID-19To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the CDC recommends wearing a face mask.Masks are required in public places in some states and businesses. Multiple major retailers have announced mask requirement policies as the nation continues to see a large number of cases reported in certain areas.The CDC also recommends you keep 6 feet of distance between yourself and others.Make sure to wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.For more tips on how to stay safe, CLICK HERE.

Children younger than 5 have between 10 and 100 times more genetic material from the novel coronavirus in their noses compared to older children and to adults, according to a small study published Thursday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

While the study didn’t measure transmissibility, it raises questions — just as schools start to reopen — about how easily the new coronavirus may be spread by the under-5 set.

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“We had just noticed that some of the children that we were testing for SARS CoV-2 that were positive, the youngest children seemed to have a high amount of the viral nucleic acid — a high viral load in their nose — compared to some of our older children and adults,” lead author Dr. Taylor Heald-Sargent, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, told CNN. “And so when we … actually ran the numbers, controlled for a few things, we found that there was actually a statistically significant higher amount of the genes that are encoded by SARS, which usually correlates to more virus, in the nose of children less than five years old, compared to older children and adults.”

Heald-Sargent and her team analyzed 145 swab samples collected from patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 within a week of symptom onset; 46 of them were from children under 5, 51 were from 5- to 17-year-olds, and 48 were from adults between 18 and 65. The samples were collected between the end of March and the end of April from various inpatient, outpatient, emergency department and drive-through testing sites at a pediatric tertiary medical center in Chicago.

They found that those under 5 had a statistically significant greater amount of virus particles in the nose correlating to “a 10-fold to 100-fold greater amount of the coronavirus in the upper respiratory tract … ” the researchers wrote in their paper.

The latest numbers

More than 4.4 million cases of the virus and 151,000 deaths have been reported in the US, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Resurgence now moving to Midwest, expert says

The resurgence in coronavirus infections that has rocked the U.S. South and West is now making its way to Midwestern states.

“What inevitably is going to happen is that the states that are not yet in trouble, will likely get into trouble,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Wednesday in an interview on MSNBC.

States including Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee are seeing an increase in the percentage of coronavirus tests coming back positive, he said, a development that preceded the spike in the South and West.

The White House coronavirus task force has warned Midwestern governors that the time to get ahead of the curve is now before the numbers start to skyrocket in their states, Fauci said.

“Before you know it, two to three weeks down the pike, you’re in trouble,” he said.

Already, West Virginia is watching coronavirus migrate from the South daily, West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice said. The state has lost five more people to the virus since Monday, bringing the total to more than 1,100 people.

“It’s just not good. That’s just all there is to it,” Justice said.

Where western and southern states stand now

States across the West and South have set records for daily cases and deaths this month as the virus has surged.

California set a grim record of 197 deaths in a single day, the California Department of Public Health reported Wednesday. The last record for the state was set just the week before at 159.

Los Angeles County also saw its highest COVID-19 death toll to date with 91 deaths, bringing the total in the county to 4,516. But the county’s Health Director Barbara Ferrer warned that some of Wednesday’s fatalities are also attributed to a reporting backlog.

Also setting a record for coronavirus deaths in one day, Florida reported 216 deaths Wednesday. The state has been at the forefront of the resurgence in coronavirus cases.

Texas cases surpass New York

Coronavirus cases in Texas have risen to more than 418,00, putting the state at a higher case count than New York.

Once the U.S. epicenter of the pandemic, New York now ranks fourth in total case count behind California, Florida and Texas, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Medical teams on the frontlines in Texas said that spikes in the state have taken a toll.

“It’s very hard. We’re seeing entire families in our communities ravaged by the virus,” said Dr. Martin Schwartz, who treats patients in intensive care units. “A lot of deaths inside one single family. It’s terrible.”

The main hotspot in the state has been the Rio Grande Valley, where hospitals began reaching capacity earlier this month.

Health officials say the pandemic is wreaking havoc on communities in Hidalgo County.

“It’s a tsunami what we’re seeing right now,” said Dr. Federico Vallejo, a critical care pulmonologist. He told CNN last week that he is treating up to 70 patients a day compared to the usual 15 to 20 a critical care doctor sees during a rotation.

Texas was one of the first states to reopen in May, but Gov. Greg Abbott announced a pause to any further reopening in June when cases surged. Now Texas is one of the 41 states to implement mask requirements in some form to protect against the virus’s spread.

Though many health experts stress the importance of wearing masks to protect against the spread of the virus, their use has been under debate in the public.

Texas Republican Louie Gohmert, who has frequently refused to wear a mask, has tested positive for the virus.

Gohmert told KETK on Wednesday he may have contracted coronavirus by incorrectly wearing his mask.

“I can’t help but think that if I hadn’t been wearing a mask so much in the last 10 days or so, I really wonder if I would have gotten it,” Gohmert added. “You know, moving the mask around, getting it just right, we’re bound to put some virus on the mask that I sucked in. That’s most likely what happened.”

While wearing a mask incorrectly can expose a person to the virus, experts say it primarily spreads person to person.

Florida sheriff issues more than 200 citations for gatherings

Florida’s Broward County sheriff says he’s got no plans to end an operation cracking down on large gatherings, which has already resulted in more than 200 citations.

The operation’s goals were two-fold, Sheriff Gregory Tony said in a virtual news conference Wednesday: to reduce the large gatherings that were taking place and to crack down on “roving car clubs” that were bringing dozens of young people together throughout certain parts of the community.

There have been more than 1,100 calls of service about parties and social gatherings, the sheriff said.

In the two weeks since the operation was launched, Tony says police have responded to at least 13 different gatherings or parties and issued more than 260 different citations.

“Anytime we’re having large gatherings of 100, 150 plus people, it’s crystal clear that we’re not seeing a compliance with the CDC recommendations and therefore more people will contract this virus,” the sheriff said.

“We have no interest at this point in time to discontinue having this type of enforcement operation,” he said.

Broward County borders Miami-Dade County, which has been called by some experts the country’s new coronavirus epicenter, with overwhelmed hospitals and maxed out ICUs sounding the alarm over the rise in patients. And in the last week, sick Floridians seeking treatment in Miami-Dade County spilled over to the neighboring county’s hospitals.

And across the state, the daily number of coronavirus-related deaths broke a record Wednesday for the second day in a row.

During his news conference, the sheriff urged the use of face masks, asking residents in the community to take a “common sense approach.”

“It’s not about the individual person anymore,” Tony said. “When you don’t wear a mask when you don’t comply, you are potentially exposing someone else. So it’s not simply about what you can do for yourself as well what you can do for other people that you don’t even know.”

He said several businesses who weren’t following coronavirus guidelines were shut down for at least a day or fined.

“We do need to get better compliance out of our community, they need to take on a greater deal of social responsibility. If not, we will be out there enforcing, citing, and writing notices,” the sheriff said.

Restart needed to get the fight against the virus back on track, experts say

Health experts are urging federal, state and local leaders to come up with policy actions to get control of the pandemic.

Scholars at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security said in a report that the U.S. needs to restart its response to the virus.

“Unlike many countries in the world, the United States is not currently on course to get control of this epidemic,” the report says. “It is time to reset.”

The report includes 10 recommendations that include universal mask mandates, federal leadership to improve testing and, in places where rates of transmission are worsening, stay-at-home orders.

Though some have called for another shut down, Fauci said the better option might be to scale back reopenings and move forward more cautiously from there.

“If you’re going to quickly call a pause, a timeout and think maybe you want to backtrack a little, not necessarily all the way back to shut down, but enough to regain your footing, so that you then proceed to open in a much more cautious fashion,” he said.

Stop the spread of COVID-19

To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the CDC recommends wearing a face mask.

Masks are required in public places in some states and businesses. Multiple major retailers have announced mask requirement policies as the nation continues to see a large number of cases reported in certain areas.

The CDC also recommends you keep 6 feet of distance between yourself and others.

Make sure to wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

For more tips on how to stay safe, CLICK HERE.

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