An alligator made its way up to a home on Eagle Lake in Mississippi on Tuesday, but it apparently wasn’t in a hurry to leave.A Warren County sheriff’s deputy and Lt. Lee Harvey with the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks were called in to wrangle the gator, which was estimated to be between 8 and 10 feet long.The Vicksburg Daily News livestreamed the entire capture on Facebook. “This one put up a pretty good little fight. He definitely didn’t want to go quietly,” Harvey said.At one point during the capture, Harvey was on the ground with the alligator as it tried to roll away. Deputy Johnny Beauchamp had the animal secured while Harvey taped its mouth and legs, the publication reported.”I was just doing my best to keep his mouth closed with my hands,” Harvey said. “When the alligator rolled, I wasn’t expecting it.””The situation he was in was one of the more dangerous,” said Ricky Flynt, coordinator of the MDWFP alligator program. “He did a good job. We’re glad the alligator was subdued and safely transported.”Flynt said reports about alligators are more frequent this time of year. The department gets between 200 and 300 calls about alligators each year.”It’s daily. We have officers every day that deal with nuisance alligator complaints,” Flynt said. “You have to treat them with respect, knowing that they’re very strong.”The alligator will be relocated.

An alligator made its way up to a home on Eagle Lake in Mississippi on Tuesday, but it apparently wasn’t in a hurry to leave.

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A Warren County sheriff’s deputy and Lt. Lee Harvey with the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks were called in to wrangle the gator, which was estimated to be between 8 and 10 feet long.

The Vicksburg Daily News livestreamed the entire capture on Facebook.

“This one put up a pretty good little fight. He definitely didn’t want to go quietly,” Harvey said.

At one point during the capture, Harvey was on the ground with the alligator as it tried to roll away. Deputy Johnny Beauchamp had the animal secured while Harvey taped its mouth and legs, the publication reported.

“I was just doing my best to keep his mouth closed with my hands,” Harvey said. “When the alligator rolled, I wasn’t expecting it.”

“The situation he was in was one of the more dangerous,” said Ricky Flynt, coordinator of the MDWFP alligator program. “He did a good job. We’re glad the alligator was subdued and safely transported.”

Flynt said reports about alligators are more frequent this time of year. The department gets between 200 and 300 calls about alligators each year.

“It’s daily. We have officers every day that deal with nuisance alligator complaints,” Flynt said. “You have to treat them with respect, knowing that they’re very strong.”

The alligator will be relocated.

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