Live updates below (listed in EST):10:20 p.m.Speaking from a Massachusetts child care center, former Democratic nomination candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren touted Joe Biden’s child care initiatives. Warren gave an emotional testimonial to the iimportance of child care for families as she talked about a time when balancing child care and her job became a burden that nearly forced her to quit her job.10:10 p.m.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and former Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton both took aim at President Donald Trump, highlighting previous skirmishes with the president and urging voters to oust him in November. Pelosi, who’s had a history of conflict with the president across his first term, warned of the dangers of keeping him in office, as well as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, whom she has also had battles with.“We have sent the Senate bills to protect our dreamers, LGBTQ equality, to prevent gun violence, and to preserve our planet for future generations, and even more,” Pelosi said. “All of this is possible for America. Who is standing in the way? Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump.”Hillary Clinton, the first woman nominated for president by a major party, spoke ahead of Barack Obama, the nation’s first Black president, and Kamala Harris, Biden’s running mate and the first Black woman on a major party ticket.“For four years, people have said to me, ‘I didn’t realize how dangerous he was.’ ‘I wish I could go back and do it over.’ Or worst, ‘I should have voted,’” Clinton said. “Well, this can’t be another woulda coulda shoulda election.”She added: “Vote like our lives and livelihoods are on the line, because they are.”Related video: Hillary Clinton makes case for Democrats in 20209:35 p.m.Singer Billie Eilish urged Americans to “vote like our lives and the world depend on it, because they do” before performing her new song “My future.”She opened her remarks by criticizing President Donald Trump, saying he is “destroying our country and everything we care about.””We need leaders who will solve problems like climate change and COVID, not deny them. Leaders who will fight against systemic racism and inequality. That starts by voting for someone who understands how much is at stake,” she said.The Los Angeles native continued: “Someone who’s building a team that shares our values. It starts with voting against Donald Trump and for Joe Biden.” “Silence is not an option, and we cannot sit this one out. We all have to vote like our lives and the world depend on it, because they do. The only way to be certain of the future is to make it ourselves. Please register, please vote.”9:25 p.m. The opening of the third night of the convention focused on gun violence in the United States, and its effects on people’s lives.Former Rep. Gabby Giffords, who was shot and wounded when a gunman opened fire on one of her events in 2011, touted the needs for resilience and strength in a powerful speech Wednesday night at the Democratic National Convention.Giffords, who was shot in the head during the deadly attack, says that while she’s “known the darkest of days,” she chose to respond with “grit and determination.”“I put one foot in front of the other. I found one word and then I found another. My recovery is a daily fight but fighting makes me stronger,” Giffords said.“Words once came easily, today I struggle to speak. But I have not lost my voice.”9:10 p.m.California Sen. Kamala Harris opened the third night of the convention, urging people to create a plan for voting.“I want to talk about the importance of voting,” Harris said, standing in what looked like the backstage of the convention set up in Delaware. Harris will accept the Democratic Party’s vice-presidential nomination and delivers her acceptance speech later in the program.Original story belowDemocrats hoping to create a surge of enthusiasm behind Joe Biden’s presidential bid will look to Wednesday’s convention headliners to broaden the party’s focus from a multipart rebuke of President Donald Trump to a message of change.Former President Barack Obama, a transformational figure for the Democratic Party who picked Biden as his running mate a dozen years ago, has top billing for the third night of the all-virtual Democratic National Convention, starting at 9 p.m. EDT.Before Obama tries to tap into the broad coalition that elected him as the country’s first Black president, the lineup is set for America to hear from Sen. Kamala Harris in her first prime-time appearance as Biden’s history-making running mate. Hillary Clinton, another barrier breaker as the first female presidential nominee of any major party, will also speak.What to watch on the third night of the convention:OBAMAWhile his wife, Michelle, opened the convention Monday night by delivering a grave censure of Trump, Barack Obama will likely focus more on the Democratic nominee and a revival of the message of hope and change that ushered in his own term in office. After remaining conspicuously absent from the fray as Biden pushed through a crowded primary contest, Obama’s address will give one of the party’s most popular figures a chance to make a personal case for the man who served by his side for two terms.Whether Obama can pass on his personal popularity to Biden won’t be immediately clear without a live audience, but expect the 44th president to describe Biden as a trusted counselor and copilot who helped him pass his signature health care law and navigate a complex world.HARRISHarris, the first Black woman and the first Asian American woman selected for a major-party ticket, gives Democrats a barrier-breaking team that echoes the landmark of Obama’s election. The California senator, who often invokes other groundbreakers such as Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman elected to Congress, will get a chance to highlight her own historic role. She will also use the moment to argue for Biden at the top of the ticket and set aside a notable moment from her first debate appearance as a presidential candidate last year, when she criticized his record on race over his previous opposition to federally mandated busing.With Harris, Democrats hope to galvanize voters heading into the fall campaign against Trump. A video set to proceed her speech shows Harris from her days on the presidential trail saying she will fight for women — especially those of color, according to a snippet released early by the campaign. Harris will say in her address that she is committed to the values her mother taught her: “To walk by faith, and not by sight, and to a vision passed on through generations of Americans — one that Joe Biden shares.”CLINTONClinton’s historic campaign for the White House remains a rallying point for party faithful, something the former first lady is likely to pay homage to in her speech. But divisions remain in the party after her candidacy and the rise of the Bernie Sanders coalition on the left. Clinton drew attention last year for seeming to magnify the split by saying about Sanders in a documentary: “Nobody likes him. Nobody wants to work with him.” She’s unlikely to revive that sentiment this week. Instead, look for her reiterate a message that does unify Democrats: skewering Trump. THE BIDEN AGENDAThough Obama will offer Democrats nostalgia for his election to and tenure in the White House, the party hopes to send a message that a Biden presidency won’t be a 2008 redux. The theme of the night is “A More Perfect Union,” with speakers set to lay out goals for a Biden presidency. Speakers include Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who unveiled a catalog of action plans during her own presidential campaign, some of which Biden has adopted. Others slated to appear include House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, who was considered a potential running mate for Biden, and former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, a prominent advocate for tighter gun restrictions who was shot in the head in an attempted assassination in 2011.TRUMPTrump is working to stay in the mix this week with a series of trips to counter the Democratic convention programming. He made appearances on Monday in Wisconsin and Minnesota and on Tuesday in Arizona, with speeches taking on Biden and the Democrats. The president plans to travel to Pennsylvania, where Biden was born, on Thursday, hours before the Democrat’s acceptance speech. The Republican president doesn’t have any travel planned for Wednesday but is likely to continue delivering his reactions to the Democratic convention on Twitter.

Live updates below (listed in EST):

10:20 p.m.

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Speaking from a Massachusetts child care center, former Democratic nomination candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren touted Joe Biden’s child care initiatives. Warren gave an emotional testimonial to the iimportance of child care for families as she talked about a time when balancing child care and her job became a burden that nearly forced her to quit her job.

10:10 p.m.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and former Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton both took aim at President Donald Trump, highlighting previous skirmishes with the president and urging voters to oust him in November.

Pelosi, who’s had a history of conflict with the president across his first term, warned of the dangers of keeping him in office, as well as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, whom she has also had battles with.

“We have sent the Senate bills to protect our dreamers, LGBTQ equality, to prevent gun violence, and to preserve our planet for future generations, and even more,” Pelosi said. “All of this is possible for America. Who is standing in the way? Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump.”

Hillary Clinton, the first woman nominated for president by a major party, spoke ahead of Barack Obama, the nation’s first Black president, and Kamala Harris, Biden’s running mate and the first Black woman on a major party ticket.

“For four years, people have said to me, ‘I didn’t realize how dangerous he was.’ ‘I wish I could go back and do it over.’ Or worst, ‘I should have voted,’” Clinton said. “Well, this can’t be another woulda coulda shoulda election.”

She added: “Vote like our lives and livelihoods are on the line, because they are.”

Related video: Hillary Clinton makes case for Democrats in 2020

9:35 p.m.

Singer Billie Eilish urged Americans to “vote like our lives and the world depend on it, because they do” before performing her new song “My future.”

She opened her remarks by criticizing President Donald Trump, saying he is “destroying our country and everything we care about.”

“We need leaders who will solve problems like climate change and COVID, not deny them. Leaders who will fight against systemic racism and inequality. That starts by voting for someone who understands how much is at stake,” she said.

The Los Angeles native continued: “Someone who’s building a team that shares our values. It starts with voting against Donald Trump and for Joe Biden.”

“Silence is not an option, and we cannot sit this one out. We all have to vote like our lives and the world depend on it, because they do. The only way to be certain of the future is to make it ourselves. Please register, please vote.”

9:25 p.m.

The opening of the third night of the convention focused on gun violence in the United States, and its effects on people’s lives.

Former Rep. Gabby Giffords, who was shot and wounded when a gunman opened fire on one of her events in 2011, touted the needs for resilience and strength in a powerful speech Wednesday night at the Democratic National Convention.

Giffords, who was shot in the head during the deadly attack, says that while she’s “known the darkest of days,” she chose to respond with “grit and determination.”

“I put one foot in front of the other. I found one word and then I found another. My recovery is a daily fight but fighting makes me stronger,” Giffords said.“Words once came easily, today I struggle to speak. But I have not lost my voice.”

9:10 p.m.

California Sen. Kamala Harris opened the third night of the convention, urging people to create a plan for voting.

“I want to talk about the importance of voting,” Harris said, standing in what looked like the backstage of the convention set up in Delaware.

Harris will accept the Democratic Party’s vice-presidential nomination and delivers her acceptance speech later in the program.

Original story below

Democrats hoping to create a surge of enthusiasm behind Joe Biden’s presidential bid will look to Wednesday’s convention headliners to broaden the party’s focus from a multipart rebuke of President Donald Trump to a message of change.

Former President Barack Obama, a transformational figure for the Democratic Party who picked Biden as his running mate a dozen years ago, has top billing for the third night of the all-virtual Democratic National Convention, starting at 9 p.m. EDT.

Before Obama tries to tap into the broad coalition that elected him as the country’s first Black president, the lineup is set for America to hear from Sen. Kamala Harris in her first prime-time appearance as Biden’s history-making running mate. Hillary Clinton, another barrier breaker as the first female presidential nominee of any major party, will also speak.

What to watch on the third night of the convention:

OBAMA

While his wife, Michelle, opened the convention Monday night by delivering a grave censure of Trump, Barack Obama will likely focus more on the Democratic nominee and a revival of the message of hope and change that ushered in his own term in office.

After remaining conspicuously absent from the fray as Biden pushed through a crowded primary contest, Obama’s address will give one of the party’s most popular figures a chance to make a personal case for the man who served by his side for two terms.

Whether Obama can pass on his personal popularity to Biden won’t be immediately clear without a live audience, but expect the 44th president to describe Biden as a trusted counselor and copilot who helped him pass his signature health care law and navigate a complex world.

HARRIS

Harris, the first Black woman and the first Asian American woman selected for a major-party ticket, gives Democrats a barrier-breaking team that echoes the landmark of Obama’s election. The California senator, who often invokes other groundbreakers such as Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman elected to Congress, will get a chance to highlight her own historic role. She will also use the moment to argue for Biden at the top of the ticket and set aside a notable moment from her first debate appearance as a presidential candidate last year, when she criticized his record on race over his previous opposition to federally mandated busing.

With Harris, Democrats hope to galvanize voters heading into the fall campaign against Trump. A video set to proceed her speech shows Harris from her days on the presidential trail saying she will fight for women — especially those of color, according to a snippet released early by the campaign. Harris will say in her address that she is committed to the values her mother taught her: “To walk by faith, and not by sight, and to a vision passed on through generations of Americans — one that Joe Biden shares.”

CLINTON

Clinton’s historic campaign for the White House remains a rallying point for party faithful, something the former first lady is likely to pay homage to in her speech. But divisions remain in the party after her candidacy and the rise of the Bernie Sanders coalition on the left. Clinton drew attention last year for seeming to magnify the split by saying about Sanders in a documentary: “Nobody likes him. Nobody wants to work with him.” She’s unlikely to revive that sentiment this week. Instead, look for her reiterate a message that does unify Democrats: skewering Trump.

THE BIDEN AGENDA

Though Obama will offer Democrats nostalgia for his election to and tenure in the White House, the party hopes to send a message that a Biden presidency won’t be a 2008 redux. The theme of the night is “A More Perfect Union,” with speakers set to lay out goals for a Biden presidency. Speakers include Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who unveiled a catalog of action plans during her own presidential campaign, some of which Biden has adopted. Others slated to appear include House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, who was considered a potential running mate for Biden, and former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, a prominent advocate for tighter gun restrictions who was shot in the head in an attempted assassination in 2011.

TRUMP

Trump is working to stay in the mix this week with a series of trips to counter the Democratic convention programming. He made appearances on Monday in Wisconsin and Minnesota and on Tuesday in Arizona, with speeches taking on Biden and the Democrats. The president plans to travel to Pennsylvania, where Biden was born, on Thursday, hours before the Democrat’s acceptance speech. The Republican president doesn’t have any travel planned for Wednesday but is likely to continue delivering his reactions to the Democratic convention on Twitter.

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