Watch live at 2:30 p.m. – Mayor and chief of police react to DOJ announcementU.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland announced Monday that there will be a civil investigation launched into the Louisville Metro police department and government more than a year after the death of Breonna Taylor.The U.S. Department of Justice will investigate whether they have violated the constitution or federal law. They’ll look into use of unreasonable force, including when people are engaging in protected speech activities, and their practices into how they serve search warrants.The investigation will include officer training, supervision and accountability, Garland said. If violations are found, the justice department will issue goals for LMPD and Louisville to meet. If the city doesn’t agree, a civil lawsuit could follow, Garland said.Merrick said the goal is to ensure everything LMPD does is “constitutional and lawful.” He said Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and LMPD Chief Erika Shields have already pledged to cooperate. “I strongly welcome the investigation,” Fischer said shortly after Garland spoke.This announcement comes less than a week after Garland said the U.S. Department of Justice would be investigating the police in Minneapolis, where George Floyd was killed by Derek Chauvin.Then, he said there could be more departments coming under investigation.LMPD has been in the national spotlight since the death of Taylor, who was killed during a raid on her apartment in March 2020. Only one of the three officers who fired their guns during the raid faces any charges, and none of them are for her death. Brett Hankison was charged with wanton endangerment for shots that went into a neighboring unit. His trial is scheduled for next year.The man behind the original warrant, Joshua Jaynes, was released from the department in January. Issues with how he obtained that warrant were raised during a Public Integrity Unit investigation. Concerns were also raised surrounding the department’s handling of the protests that followed Taylor’s death. Just earlier this month, video surfaced showing LMPD repeatedly punching a man during an arrest, someone who is considered a regular figure at Jefferson Square Park.Shields immediately responded saying an internal investigation into the incident was underway.Louisville and Kentucky have made some reforms in the past year, including banning no-knock warrants in the city, and limiting them across the state. Merrick noted the reforms in his address.Fischer said they’ve been building toward this audit for months.

Watch live at 2:30 p.m. – Mayor and chief of police react to DOJ announcement

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland announced Monday that there will be a civil investigation launched into the Louisville Metro police department and government more than a year after the death of Breonna Taylor.

Advertisement

The U.S. Department of Justice will investigate whether they have violated the constitution or federal law. They’ll look into use of unreasonable force, including when people are engaging in protected speech activities, and their practices into how they serve search warrants.

The investigation will include officer training, supervision and accountability, Garland said. If violations are found, the justice department will issue goals for LMPD and Louisville to meet. If the city doesn’t agree, a civil lawsuit could follow, Garland said.

Merrick said the goal is to ensure everything LMPD does is “constitutional and lawful.” He said Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and LMPD Chief Erika Shields have already pledged to cooperate.

“I strongly welcome the investigation,” Fischer said shortly after Garland spoke.

This announcement comes less than a week after Garland said the U.S. Department of Justice would be investigating the police in Minneapolis, where George Floyd was killed by Derek Chauvin.

Then, he said there could be more departments coming under investigation.

LMPD has been in the national spotlight since the death of Taylor, who was killed during a raid on her apartment in March 2020.

Breonna Taylor

Hearst Owned

Only one of the three officers who fired their guns during the raid faces any charges, and none of them are for her death. Brett Hankison was charged with wanton endangerment for shots that went into a neighboring unit. His trial is scheduled for next year.

The man behind the original warrant, Joshua Jaynes, was released from the department in January. Issues with how he obtained that warrant were raised during a Public Integrity Unit investigation.

Concerns were also raised surrounding the department’s handling of the protests that followed Taylor’s death.

Just earlier this month, video surfaced showing LMPD repeatedly punching a man during an arrest, someone who is considered a regular figure at Jefferson Square Park.

Shields immediately responded saying an internal investigation into the incident was underway.

Louisville and Kentucky have made some reforms in the past year, including banning no-knock warrants in the city, and limiting them across the state. Merrick noted the reforms in his address.

Fischer said they’ve been building toward this audit for months.

Source