A 5-year-old girl in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, had a new friendship, delivered right to her front door.Molly Zehnder often hurries out her front door to say “hi” to Kevin Keiweg.He was first known as the man in the big brown truck.”I like that he comes over and gives me packages,” she said.Keiweg has been with UPS for 36 years and has been on that particular route for more than 20 of them.”I know a lot of the people here,” he said.In the last year or so Keiweg has really gotten to know the Zehnders.”We’d write a little note and Molly writes her name, and she’d write him like, ‘I hope you have a great day.’ Here’s a muffin,” her mom, Amy Zehnder, said.The friendship blossomed from there.The two shared elbow bumps and conversations.Through those daily chats, Keiweg learned about Molly and her brain.”I have the fluid in there,” she said.The condition is called hydrocephalus. It requires a team of doctors at Children’s Wisconsin.”He took the time to get to know Molly and he doesn’t magnify the things that are difficult for her to do, but he amplifies what she can do,” Amy Zehnder said.Keiweg called it a two-way friendship, even getting a Molly pep talk before a recent shoulder surgery.”Her conditions and everything she’s been through, I mean, it’s amazing that she has such a positive outlook on life, you know. It’s just awesome,” he said.They’re an unlikely team now with an unbreakable bond.Because of their friendship, Keiweg was able to secure a $10,000 grant through the UPS Foundation. It will go to Children’s Wisconsin where Molly spent the first year of her life.

A 5-year-old girl in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, had a new friendship, delivered right to her front door.

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Molly Zehnder often hurries out her front door to say “hi” to Kevin Keiweg.

He was first known as the man in the big brown truck.

“I like that he comes over and gives me packages,” she said.

Keiweg has been with UPS for 36 years and has been on that particular route for more than 20 of them.

“I know a lot of the people here,” he said.

In the last year or so Keiweg has really gotten to know the Zehnders.

“We’d write a little note and Molly writes her name, and she’d write him like, ‘I hope you have a great day.’ Here’s a muffin,” her mom, Amy Zehnder, said.

The friendship blossomed from there.

The two shared elbow bumps and conversations.

Through those daily chats, Keiweg learned about Molly and her brain.

“I have the fluid in there,” she said.

The condition is called hydrocephalus.

It requires a team of doctors at Children’s Wisconsin.

“He took the time to get to know Molly and he doesn’t magnify the things that are difficult for her to do, but he amplifies what she can do,” Amy Zehnder said.

Keiweg called it a two-way friendship, even getting a Molly pep talk before a recent shoulder surgery.

“Her conditions and everything she’s been through, I mean, it’s amazing that she has such a positive outlook on life, you know. It’s just awesome,” he said.

They’re an unlikely team now with an unbreakable bond.

Because of their friendship, Keiweg was able to secure a $10,000 grant through the UPS Foundation.

It will go to Children’s Wisconsin where Molly spent the first year of her life.

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