For Domestic Violence Awareness Month, lives lost at the hands of domestic violence were honored in downtown Louisville by the Center for Women and Families.Purple flowers were laid on 22 empty chairs — each with the name of a person gone too soon. Those names ranged from 27-year-old Mary Roos, whose body was found inside a trash can in a Chickasaw alley, to Del’Luna Banks, who was only 7-weeks-old when she died at the hands of her father.”Domestic violence is real,” Adrian Walters said. “A lot of people don’t get the help that they need and then it’s too late.”Walters was invited to the ceremony to place a flower on the chair with her brother’s name — John Brasher who was killed in late July.”It brought everything to home,” Walters said.Brasher was part of nearly 36% of men in Kentucky who experience domestic violence according to data. For women, it’s almost half, at 45.3%.There was also a message of hope from a survivor of domestic violence who said she suffered in silence like many others.”If my abuser was still alive, I have a strong feeling I would be one of the chairs in the circle today,” Alison Addie said. “We are part of a society that too often fails to recognize the reality that is domestic violence. Somewhere in our community today a person is searching for a story similar to theirs that makes them feel a little less lonely in their experience that is domestic violence.”But through her pain, Addie believed she gained one of her greatest powers — her voice.”We are not alone and that means there’s still more work to do,” Addie said.If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, you can reach the Center for Women and Families at 581-7222. Their services are free.You can reach the Center for Women and Families crisis hotline by calling 1-844-237-2331.If you don’t feel safe calling, you can also reach out on Facebook. The center’s messages are monitored 24/7.

For Domestic Violence Awareness Month, lives lost at the hands of domestic violence were honored in downtown Louisville by the Center for Women and Families.

Purple flowers were laid on 22 empty chairs — each with the name of a person gone too soon. Those names ranged from 27-year-old Mary Roos, whose body was found inside a trash can in a Chickasaw alley, to Del’Luna Banks, who was only 7-weeks-old when she died at the hands of her father.

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“Domestic violence is real,” Adrian Walters said. “A lot of people don’t get the help that they need and then it’s too late.”

Walters was invited to the ceremony to place a flower on the chair with her brother’s name — John Brasher who was killed in late July.

“It brought everything to home,” Walters said.

Brasher was part of nearly 36% of men in Kentucky who experience domestic violence according to data. For women, it’s almost half, at 45.3%.

There was also a message of hope from a survivor of domestic violence who said she suffered in silence like many others.

“If my abuser was still alive, I have a strong feeling I would be one of the chairs in the circle today,” Alison Addie said. “We are part of a society that too often fails to recognize the reality that is domestic violence. Somewhere in our community today a person is searching for a story similar to theirs that makes them feel a little less lonely in their experience that is domestic violence.”

But through her pain, Addie believed she gained one of her greatest powers — her voice.

“We are not alone and that means there’s still more work to do,” Addie said.

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, you can reach the Center for Women and Families at 581-7222. Their services are free.

You can reach the Center for Women and Families crisis hotline by calling 1-844-237-2331.

If you don’t feel safe calling, you can also reach out on Facebook. The center’s messages are monitored 24/7.

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