Ten months after being shot, a victim of gun violence in Louisville, which has been at an all-time high, spoke about his struggle.Khatry Abdhalli was driving for a ride-share service when he was shot during a robbery. A bullet severed his spine and he lost all function below his neck. “I wake up (after) two months and they tell me somebody has shot me,” Abdhalli told WLKY. Abdhalli spent 260 days at UofL Hospital. In his time there, the medical staff says he has become a member of their family. Thursday was his 31st birthday. Abdhalli said before he was shot, he played soccer. “I played 10 years. I play for my coach. I’m going to play in another country. I play game in my country,” he said.And even through tears, he says he is very happy. But he says the violence is Louisville is hard to understand.”I think Khatry hit the nail on the head when he said he didn’t understand. It is heart-wrenching. People don’t know what they go through. Khatry is 31 and he is way too young for him to have his life altered in such a drastic way. He was at work. driving his car, probably making people laugh and smile, and someone chose violence over the life of a human being,” Katie Eifert, a nurse at UofL Hospital, said.Last week, Khatry left the hospital and moved to a rehab center, where he will need life-long care.

Ten months after being shot, a victim of gun violence in Louisville, which has been at an all-time high, spoke about his struggle.

Advertisement

Khatry Abdhalli was driving for a ride-share service when he was shot during a robbery. A bullet severed his spine and he lost all function below his neck.

“I wake up (after) two months and they tell me somebody has shot me,” Abdhalli told WLKY.

Abdhalli spent 260 days at UofL Hospital. In his time there, the medical staff says he has become a member of their family.

Thursday was his 31st birthday.

Abdhalli said before he was shot, he played soccer. “I played 10 years. I play for my coach. I’m going to play in another country. I play game in my country,” he said.

And even through tears, he says he is very happy. But he says the violence is Louisville is hard to understand.

“I think Khatry hit the nail on the head when he said he didn’t understand. It is heart-wrenching. People don’t know what they go through. Khatry is 31 and he is way too young for him to have his life altered in such a drastic way. He was at work. driving his car, probably making people laugh and smile, and someone chose violence over the life of a human being,” Katie Eifert, a nurse at UofL Hospital, said.

Last week, Khatry left the hospital and moved to a rehab center, where he will need life-long care.

Source