A 12-page summary included in the massive Public Integrity Unit file on the Breonna Taylor case details both breaches of police protocol and issues investigators encountered as they tried to piece together what happened the night Taylor was shot and killed. Sgt. Jason Vance, an investigator with the PIU, prepared the report in July after Louisville Metro Police investigators were instructed to stop actively investigating the case, turning it over to the attorney general’s office. Click here to see the entire PIU reportIn the summary report, Vance describes several instances where LMPD protocol was not followed after the shooting. Former officer Brett Hankison, it states, was supposed to go to the PIU office, but instead walked around the scene and then went to the hospital where he spoke with former Chief Steve Conrad. The report also states that investigators asked for a copy of the operations plan for the search warrant served at Taylor’s apartment, but never received one. As their inquiry continued, PIU investigators encountered problems. Vance dedicates five paragraphs in the report to outline how Maj. Kim Burbrink, commander of the Criminal Interdiction Division, inserted herself into the investigation. Vance says, despite objections from the PIU, Burbrink attended a briefing on the case in mid-May. According to the report, Burbrink “began asking pointed questions about the investigation.” When investigators mentioned inconsistencies in Hankison’s story, Burbrink “took opposition with investigators and requested investigators to list the inconsistencies.” The report calls her behavior in the meeting a “cross examination of the investigation.” Deputy Chief Rob Schroeder, who was later named interim chief before retiring, apologized for Burbrink’s actions twice.The report also details issues with Det. Joshua Jaynes’ account of how the search warrant for Taylor’s apartment was obtained. PIU investigators determined Jaynes and other officers were told no suspicious packages were being delivered to her home on Springfield Drive. This is inconsistent with what Jaynes swore to on the search warrant affidavit. Investigators called his wording “misleading” and concluded Jaynes “should be reviewed for criminal actions.” Vance also includes that investigators requested a follow-up interview with Sgt. Jon Mattingly, who was shot in the leg during the incident. The report says Mattingly denied that request, citing threats made against him and the “misinformation reported by the media.” It’s unclear whether investigators made another attempt to speak to Mattingly.The last page of the 234-page report details a ballistics issue that appears to remain unresolved. In June, ballistics experts with the FARO company went back to Taylor’s apartment to determine where one of the bullets fired by Hankison ended up. Those experts established a trajectory for one of the shots fired by Hankison from the bedroom window. A rendering created by the experts show the bullet traveling from the window, through the bedroom and landing in the hallway where Taylor’s body was found. In July, investigators met with the medical examiner to discuss whether that bullet could have been one of the five that hit Taylor. The medical examiner said it was possible the bullet could have caused one of Taylor’s injuries; either the injury to her right heel, the injury to her abdomen, or the fatal injury to her chest. Vance ends his report saying “an absolute determination is not possible” because the bullets removed from Taylor’s body “were not suitable for comparison to associate a specific projectile with an officer.” None of the issues Vance raised in his report were included in the evidence presented to the grand jury in this case, based on the recordings of the grand jury hearing that were released last week.

A 12-page summary included in the massive Public Integrity Unit file on the Breonna Taylor case details both breaches of police protocol and issues investigators encountered as they tried to piece together what happened the night Taylor was shot and killed.

Sgt. Jason Vance, an investigator with the PIU, prepared the report in July after Louisville Metro Police investigators were instructed to stop actively investigating the case, turning it over to the attorney general’s office.

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Click here to see the entire PIU report

In the summary report, Vance describes several instances where LMPD protocol was not followed after the shooting. Former officer Brett Hankison, it states, was supposed to go to the PIU office, but instead walked around the scene and then went to the hospital where he spoke with former Chief Steve Conrad.

The report also states that investigators asked for a copy of the operations plan for the search warrant served at Taylor’s apartment, but never received one.

As their inquiry continued, PIU investigators encountered problems.

Vance dedicates five paragraphs in the report to outline how Maj. Kim Burbrink, commander of the Criminal Interdiction Division, inserted herself into the investigation. Vance says, despite objections from the PIU, Burbrink attended a briefing on the case in mid-May.

According to the report, Burbrink “began asking pointed questions about the investigation.” When investigators mentioned inconsistencies in Hankison’s story, Burbrink “took opposition with investigators and requested investigators to list the inconsistencies.” The report calls her behavior in the meeting a “cross examination of the investigation.” Deputy Chief Rob Schroeder, who was later named interim chief before retiring, apologized for Burbrink’s actions twice.

The report also details issues with Det. Joshua Jaynes’ account of how the search warrant for Taylor’s apartment was obtained. PIU investigators determined Jaynes and other officers were told no suspicious packages were being delivered to her home on Springfield Drive. This is inconsistent with what Jaynes swore to on the search warrant affidavit. Investigators called his wording “misleading” and concluded Jaynes “should be reviewed for criminal actions.”

Vance also includes that investigators requested a follow-up interview with Sgt. Jon Mattingly, who was shot in the leg during the incident. The report says Mattingly denied that request, citing threats made against him and the “misinformation reported by the media.” It’s unclear whether investigators made another attempt to speak to Mattingly.

The last page of the 234-page report details a ballistics issue that appears to remain unresolved. In June, ballistics experts with the FARO company went back to Taylor’s apartment to determine where one of the bullets fired by Hankison ended up. Those experts established a trajectory for one of the shots fired by Hankison from the bedroom window. A rendering created by the experts show the bullet traveling from the window, through the bedroom and landing in the hallway where Taylor’s body was found.

In July, investigators met with the medical examiner to discuss whether that bullet could have been one of the five that hit Taylor. The medical examiner said it was possible the bullet could have caused one of Taylor’s injuries; either the injury to her right heel, the injury to her abdomen, or the fatal injury to her chest.

Vance ends his report saying “an absolute determination is not possible” because the bullets removed from Taylor’s body “were not suitable for comparison to associate a specific projectile with an officer.”

None of the issues Vance raised in his report were included in the evidence presented to the grand jury in this case, based on the recordings of the grand jury hearing that were released last week.

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