A new initiative hopes to curb the gun violence that plagued Louisville in 2020 and now impacting the community this year.Next month, the city will implement a new program called the Group Violence Intervention as part of an effort to decrease the overall gun violence.Louisville is coming off a record-breaking year of criminal homicides and this year is showing no signs of slowing down with 11 homicides in 15 days.”We don’t want to see another 173 people dead at the end of this year. We’ve already seen far too many as 2021 has started,” said Jessie Halladay, the Group Violence Intervention Project Manager.It’s a joint effort between social workers, community and federal partners to step into the lives of those most at risk, many of who are on probation or parole.”If you need job training, we can help find you job training. If you need anger management or therapy that you’ve experienced in your life,” said Halladay.Jessie Halladay with the mayor’s office is coordinating the efforts.”I was on the phone this week with partners in South Bend, Detroit and Chicago who have all used this practice and seen some success with it,” Halladay told WLKY.As far as those in the community, they’ll meet with people like Krista Gwynn. She plans on sharing what it’s like to be on the side of a family who’s lost a loved one to gun violence.”It doesn’t get any easier, it doesn’t get any better. Tears are not less than the first day that we lost him,” she said.Her son, 19-year-old Christian, was gunned down back in 2019. Gwynn and her family are getting involved in the program to make a difference to younger generations.”They need somebody to show them some kind of direction, to give them some kind of hope to let them know that even though they may have done something wrong in their past, there is still hope for their future,” Gwynn told WLKY.While Halladay and others are encouraged by the results from other cities, they know this program isn’t for everyone.”We’ll help you if you let us, we’ll stop you if you make us,” she said.

A new initiative hopes to curb the gun violence that plagued Louisville in 2020 and now impacting the community this year.

Next month, the city will implement a new program called the Group Violence Intervention as part of an effort to decrease the overall gun violence.

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Louisville is coming off a record-breaking year of criminal homicides and this year is showing no signs of slowing down with 11 homicides in 15 days.

“We don’t want to see another 173 people dead at the end of this year. We’ve already seen far too many as 2021 has started,” said Jessie Halladay, the Group Violence Intervention Project Manager.

It’s a joint effort between social workers, community and federal partners to step into the lives of those most at risk, many of who are on probation or parole.

“If you need job training, we can help find you job training. If you need anger management or therapy that you’ve experienced in your life,” said Halladay.

Jessie Halladay with the mayor’s office is coordinating the efforts.

“I was on the phone this week with partners in South Bend, Detroit and Chicago who have all used this practice and seen some success with it,” Halladay told WLKY.

As far as those in the community, they’ll meet with people like Krista Gwynn. She plans on sharing what it’s like to be on the side of a family who’s lost a loved one to gun violence.

“It doesn’t get any easier, it doesn’t get any better. Tears are not less than the first day that we lost him,” she said.

Her son, 19-year-old Christian, was gunned down back in 2019. Gwynn and her family are getting involved in the program to make a difference to younger generations.

“They need somebody to show them some kind of direction, to give them some kind of hope to let them know that even though they may have done something wrong in their past, there is still hope for their future,” Gwynn told WLKY.

While Halladay and others are encouraged by the results from other cities, they know this program isn’t for everyone.

“We’ll help you if you let us, we’ll stop you if you make us,” she said.

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