Like many of the other vulnerable in Louisville, a man who goes by the name Detroit was given what he calls a life-saving offer this past week. Community members in the metro area set up a money drive to buy hotel rooms at several Woodspring Suites in town. He was able to escape the freezing temperatures, but his tent, his clothes and other personal belongings were left on Market Street under a bridge.“We didn’t know that it was going to be taken by the city,” said Detroit. “We didn’t know that they were going to take all of our stuff, or we probably would’ve packed it with us.”Friday morning Detroit went to check on his belongings before returning back to the hotel. He turned on the TV, and found out all of his stuff was gone.“It makes me mad,” said Detroit. “When you don’t have anything, and somebody takes the nothing that you have, it’s a horrible feeling.”According to the co-founder of FEED Louisville, Donny Greene, it was a routine incident gone wrong. He said, to his understanding, LMPD was sent to the area for a cleaning, where they allow the homeless to move their stuff so that they can clean the sidewalk, and then everybody can go back on the sidewalk. However, he arrived to a scene he was not expecting.“When I got there they had cleared, at that point, somewhere between nine and eleven tents,” said Greene. “Along with everyone’s personal belongings that were there, or that they couldn’t have gotten out of there.Later that night Louisville Metro Police issued a statement, writing in part “LMPD takes full responsibility for the miscommunication leading to these circumstances, and we apologize for this error.”The statement also stated that LMPD officers went back out to the street in an attempt to replace the tents. They also brought a tarp, warmth materials, and moved the remaining personal items to a place where they can be temporarily housed.“I was there, they didn’t replace or restore anything,” said Greene. ”They did not replace the nine to eleven tents, or anyone else’s personal belongings, sleeping bags or anything else. That’s complete fabrication on LMPD’s part.The department claims to begin working on new standard operating procedures to ensure a similar situation does not happen in the future, however, Greene believes Friday’s incident is the direct result of a larger problem.“We desperately need housing, in this city, and we need real housing not shelters,” said Greene. “Housing is a basic human right, everyone deserves it, and that’s where we have to go from here.”It was reported earlier help for that could come by way of the city, as district four councilman Jecorey Arthur plans to make his voice heard on the issue.We reached out to LMPD for further comment on the situation, and they have declined to relinquish more information.

Like many of the other vulnerable in Louisville, a man who goes by the name Detroit was given what he calls a life-saving offer this past week. Community members in the metro area set up a money drive to buy hotel rooms at several Woodspring Suites in town.

He was able to escape the freezing temperatures, but his tent, his clothes and other personal belongings were left on Market Street under a bridge.

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“We didn’t know that it was going to be taken by the city,” said Detroit. “We didn’t know that they were going to take all of our stuff, or we probably would’ve packed it with us.”

Friday morning Detroit went to check on his belongings before returning back to the hotel. He turned on the TV, and found out all of his stuff was gone.

“It makes me mad,” said Detroit. “When you don’t have anything, and somebody takes the nothing that you have, it’s a horrible feeling.”

According to the co-founder of FEED Louisville, Donny Greene, it was a routine incident gone wrong. He said, to his understanding, LMPD was sent to the area for a cleaning, where they allow the homeless to move their stuff so that they can clean the sidewalk, and then everybody can go back on the sidewalk. However, he arrived to a scene he was not expecting.

“When I got there they had cleared, at that point, somewhere between nine and eleven tents,” said Greene. “Along with everyone’s personal belongings that were there, or that they couldn’t have gotten out of there.

Later that night Louisville Metro Police issued a statement, writing in part “LMPD takes full responsibility for the miscommunication leading to these circumstances, and we apologize for this error.”

The statement also stated that LMPD officers went back out to the street in an attempt to replace the tents. They also brought a tarp, warmth materials, and moved the remaining personal items to a place where they can be temporarily housed.

“I was there, they didn’t replace or restore anything,” said Greene. ”They did not replace the nine to eleven tents, or anyone else’s personal belongings, sleeping bags or anything else. That’s complete fabrication on LMPD’s part.

The department claims to begin working on new standard operating procedures to ensure a similar situation does not happen in the future, however, Greene believes Friday’s incident is the direct result of a larger problem.

“We desperately need housing, in this city, and we need real housing not shelters,” said Greene. “Housing is a basic human right, everyone deserves it, and that’s where we have to go from here.”

It was reported earlier help for that could come by way of the city, as district four councilman Jecorey Arthur plans to make his voice heard on the issue.

We reached out to LMPD for further comment on the situation, and they have declined to relinquish more information.

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