A Louisville-based recording artist is using his personal story to normalize conversations about mental health as the nation spotlights mental health awareness this month.FAIF, whose stage name means For Anyone In Fear, wants to end the stigmas that are often associated with mental health issues.His smooth R&B music is just one layer of singer/songwriter FAIF’s story. There are recent chapters that include grief and depression, he told WLKY’s Marvis Herring on Monday.FAIF explained that life got out of tune when he lost two of his best friends, Kerry Benson and Germina Cruz, in a 2014 crash. FAIF was also in the car.“I was the only lone survivor and I battled with depression a lot through that time,” the Louisville native said. “I used music at that time to connect with people.”With more than 19,000 Instagram followers, he’s now using his online reach to inform more people that it is OK to ask for mental health help.FAIF teamed up with the Pete Foundation, an established advocate for bettering mental health, to host a Monday event on Instagram Live.FAIF said that the event, which begins on his Instagram page at 6 p.m. Monday, will have a judgement-free atmosphere.“Losing two of my closest friends in a car accident was one of the most traumatic things that has ever happened in my life and it has changed my life,” FAIF said. “I just want to change a life and save a life.”The virtual conversation, which will include a Q&A session, is just one of several events planned by Mental Health Louisville in honor of Mental Health Awareness Month.The director of the group, Amanda Villaveces, said that events like these will help the community heal.“Therapists were flooded over the last year, which is a good thing in some ways because it shows that people are recognizing the importance of mental health and they’re seeking help,” said Villaveces. “But, we definitely saw that the community was suffering whether it was grief, anxiety, isolation and depression.“This is a conversation that needs to be had whether you’re young, whether you’re old, Black, white– it doesn’t matter your race, it’s just a conversation that needs to be open,” FAIF said.

A Louisville-based recording artist is using his personal story to normalize conversations about mental health as the nation spotlights mental health awareness this month.

FAIF, whose stage name means For Anyone In Fear, wants to end the stigmas that are often associated with mental health issues.

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His smooth R&B music is just one layer of singer/songwriter FAIF’s story.

There are recent chapters that include grief and depression, he told WLKY’s Marvis Herring on Monday.

FAIF explained that life got out of tune when he lost two of his best friends, Kerry Benson and Germina Cruz, in a 2014 crash. FAIF was also in the car.

“I was the only lone survivor and I battled with depression a lot through that time,” the Louisville native said. “I used music at that time to connect with people.”

With more than 19,000 Instagram followers, he’s now using his online reach to inform more people that it is OK to ask for mental health help.

FAIF teamed up with the Pete Foundation, an established advocate for bettering mental health, to host a Monday event on Instagram Live.

faif official, mental health, louisville

FAIF Official

FAIF said that the event, which begins on his Instagram page at 6 p.m. Monday, will have a judgement-free atmosphere.

“Losing two of my closest friends in a car accident was one of the most traumatic things that has ever happened in my life and it has changed my life,” FAIF said. “I just want to change a life and save a life.”

The virtual conversation, which will include a Q&A session, is just one of several events planned by Mental Health Louisville in honor of Mental Health Awareness Month.

The director of the group, Amanda Villaveces, said that events like these will help the community heal.

“Therapists were flooded over the last year, which is a good thing in some ways because it shows that people are recognizing the importance of mental health and they’re seeking help,” said Villaveces. “But, we definitely saw that the community was suffering whether it was grief, anxiety, isolation and depression.

“This is a conversation that needs to be had whether you’re young, whether you’re old, Black, white– it doesn’t matter your race, it’s just a conversation that needs to be open,” FAIF said.

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