FOR REVEREND CHARLES ELIOT MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY BRINGS BACK MEMORIES TO HIS YOUNGER DAYS HERE AT KING SOLOMON MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH RIGHT BACK HERE WAS MY OFFICE. THIS IS WHAT I BROUGHT DR. KING IN BUT TALK ABOUT DR. KING DOWN. YEAH. HE WAS TRYING TO BUILD MY NERVES UP IS THE MARKS READY. I’M AND HE HE SAID I NEED YOU TO GET TO YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE 1960S WHILE IN HIS LATE TEENS AND EARLY 20S ELLIOT MARCHED WITH KING SEVERAL TIMES ACROSS THE COUNTRY FROM SELMA ALABAMA WHERE HE WAS BEATEN BY STATE TROOPERS AND TEAR GASSED TO THE PEACEFUL MARCH ON FRANKFORT FIGHTING AGAINST DISCRIMINATION IN THE WORKPLACE, BUT THERE’S ONE MARCH HERE IN LOUISVILLE. THAT STICKS OUT AFTER HE SAYS A WHITE EIGHT-YEAR-OLD CHILD THREW A ROCK AT KING AND HIT OK ON THE JOB. MMM I CAN’T REST DOWN AND GOT BEDROCK. AND SAYS I’M GOING TO BUILD ON THIS ROCK LOVE. JUSTICE EQUALITY IT WAS AFTER HEARING THAT SPEECH. HE SAYS THE ATMOSPHERE CHANGED AND BY THAT TIME THE RIGHT GUY WIDOW’S DECIDE TO TO WALK IN WITH US. AND WHEN WE GOT THE BOTTOMS CHURCH GREEN STREET HAD MORE WHITE IN THERE. THEY WERE HAD BLACK FOR AUTHOR POET AND ACTIVIST HANNAH DRAKE KING’S MESSAGE OF PEACE UNITY AND TOGETHERNESS FOR ALL PEOPLE WHO RESONATES WITH HER. SHE JUST WANDERS IF THAT MESSAGE FALLS ON DEAF EARS AND EVEN HERE IN KENTUCKY THERE WERE TWEETS ABOUT KENTUCKY AND THEY WERE TWEETING ABOUT HIS MESSAGE AND I SAID, LET’S NOT PRETEND. JUST A FEW MONTHS AGO. YOU WERE TEAR GASSING PEOPLE. YOU WERE SHOOTING RUBBER BULLETS AFTER MONTHS OF UNREST IN LOUISVILLE OVER THE DEATH OF BRIANNA TAYLOR DRAKE SAYS, DR. KING’S MESSAGE SHOULD BE MORE THAN JUST WORDS TYPED ON JANUARY 18TH, BUT SOMETHING THAT’S LIVED BY AND I CHALLENGE PEOPLE BE THE DREAM. DON’T TALK ABOUT THE DREAM BE IT BE THE DREAM PERSONIFIED. PUT YOUR FEET TO WORK PUT YOUR HANDS TO WORK WHAT YOUR E

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Louisville pastor reminisces on marches alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the 1960s

For Rev. Charles Elliott, Martin Luther King Day brings back memories of his younger days here at King Solomon Missionary Baptist Church.”Right back here was my office and this is where I brought Dr. King in,” said Elliott. “Whenever I talked to Dr. King down here, he was trying to build my nerves up to march with him and he said, ‘I need you to get the young people.'”In the ’60s, while in his late teens and early 20s, Elliott marched with King several times across the country. From Selma, Alabama, where he was beaten by state troopers and tear-gassed to the peaceful march on Frankfort fighting against discrimination in the workplace.But there’s one march in Louisville that sticks out, one in which he says a white 8-year-old child threw a rock at Dr. King.”It hit King on the jaw. He got down and got the rock and said ‘I’m going to build on this rock, love, justice, equality,'” Elliott told WLKY.It was after that speech in Louisville that he says the atmosphere changed.”By that time, the white people got with us and started walking with us and when we got to Greene Street, we had more whites than we had Black,” said Elliott.For author, poet and activist Hannah Drake — King’s message of peace, unity and togetherness for all people resonates with her. She just wonders if that message falls on deaf ears.”Even here in Kentucky, there were tweets and they were tweeting about his message and I’m like, ‘Let’s not pretend, just a few months ago, you were tear gassing people, you were shooting rubber bullets at people,'” Drake told WLKY.After months of social unrest in Louisville over the death of Breonna Taylor, Drake says Dr. King’s words should be more than just words typed on Jan. 18, but something that’s lived by.”I challenge people to be the dream, don’t talk about the dream but be it. Be the dream personified, put your feet to work, put your hands to work and let your eyes see what’s happening,” said Drake.Rev. Elliott believes Dr. King would be proud of the unity of Black and white people marching and protesting against racial injustice.

For Rev. Charles Elliott, Martin Luther King Day brings back memories of his younger days here at King Solomon Missionary Baptist Church.

“Right back here was my office and this is where I brought Dr. King in,” said Elliott. “Whenever I talked to Dr. King down here, he was trying to build my nerves up to march with him and he said, ‘I need you to get the young people.'”

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In the ’60s, while in his late teens and early 20s, Elliott marched with King several times across the country. From Selma, Alabama, where he was beaten by state troopers and tear-gassed to the peaceful march on Frankfort fighting against discrimination in the workplace.

But there’s one march in Louisville that sticks out, one in which he says a white 8-year-old child threw a rock at Dr. King.

“It hit King on the jaw. He got down and got the rock and said ‘I’m going to build on this rock, love, justice, equality,'” Elliott told WLKY.

It was after that speech in Louisville that he says the atmosphere changed.

“By that time, the white people got with us and started walking with us and when we got to Greene Street, we had more whites than we had Black,” said Elliott.

For author, poet and activist Hannah Drake — King’s message of peace, unity and togetherness for all people resonates with her. She just wonders if that message falls on deaf ears.

“Even here in Kentucky, there were tweets and they were tweeting about his message and I’m like, ‘Let’s not pretend, just a few months ago, you were tear gassing people, you were shooting rubber bullets at people,'” Drake told WLKY.

After months of social unrest in Louisville over the death of Breonna Taylor, Drake says Dr. King’s words should be more than just words typed on Jan. 18, but something that’s lived by.

“I challenge people to be the dream, don’t talk about the dream but be it. Be the dream personified, put your feet to work, put your hands to work and let your eyes see what’s happening,” said Drake.

Rev. Elliott believes Dr. King would be proud of the unity of Black and white people marching and protesting against racial injustice.

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