Erica Hector is preparing for an upcoming court date after receiving an eviction notice from the landlord who owns the strip mall that houses her business, Stacey’s Donuts.Hector’s experience during the pandemic has been filled with many hardships: From having to let all her employees go, to bills piling up, and now the possibility of losing her shop altogether. For a first-time business owner, it was one gut punch after another.“It got to the point, I can recall we made like $69 on one day, that’s how bad it was declining,” said Hector.Her experience as a restaurant owner amid two shutdowns aligns closely with that of other bar and restaurant owners across the state.“Our restaurants are tired,” said Stacy Roof, president of the Kentucky Restaurant Association. “Their backs are up against the wall and they’ve had the carpet yanked out from under them time and time again.”After Gov. Andy Beshear announced that businesses would have to stop indoor service for a second time, he promised grants in the form of the Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund. Beshear set aside $40 million of Kentucky’s share of the federal CARES Act money to create the assistance.Qualified business owners began applying for the fund on Monday, where they can receive up to $10,000 grants, with a limit of $20,000 in total grants to establishments that are owned by the same individuals.“For them to have three weekends taken away from them, which is where they make the bulk of their money, especially during the season when people are shopping or running errands or are out and about, it just doesn’t come close to being what they need to get through this time,” said Roof.Hector is among more than 2,000 restaurant and bar owners across the state who applied for assistance. She says any form of help during this time, no matter how big or small, is appreciated, and she’s grateful for the governor’s gesture.“I feel like he’s done what he can possibly do”, she said. “Whether I get it or not, it’s other businesses that are going to be able to benefit from this.”Stacey’s Donuts will not remain at its physical location on Factory Lane Road much longer, but Hector is transitioning to a food truck that is expected to be up and running by early next year.“You know how the popsicle trucks go around different neighborhoods, that’s what I would like to do,” she said. “I would like to go around and have some music playing and sell some fresh donuts.”For now, the shop will still offer delivery, participate in pop up shops, and prepare for the business’ next chapter.The application deadline for the Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund is Dec. 18 or until all the funds are exhausted.

Erica Hector is preparing for an upcoming court date after receiving an eviction notice from the landlord who owns the strip mall that houses her business, Stacey’s Donuts.

Hector’s experience during the pandemic has been filled with many hardships: From having to let all her employees go, to bills piling up, and now the possibility of losing her shop altogether. For a first-time business owner, it was one gut punch after another.

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“It got to the point, I can recall we made like $69 on one day, that’s how bad it was declining,” said Hector.

Her experience as a restaurant owner amid two shutdowns aligns closely with that of other bar and restaurant owners across the state.

“Our restaurants are tired,” said Stacy Roof, president of the Kentucky Restaurant Association. “Their backs are up against the wall and they’ve had the carpet yanked out from under them time and time again.”

After Gov. Andy Beshear announced that businesses would have to stop indoor service for a second time, he promised grants in the form of the Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund. Beshear set aside $40 million of Kentucky’s share of the federal CARES Act money to create the assistance.

Qualified business owners began applying for the fund on Monday, where they can receive up to $10,000 grants, with a limit of $20,000 in total grants to establishments that are owned by the same individuals.

“For them to have three weekends taken away from them, which is where they make the bulk of their money, especially during the season when people are shopping or running errands or are out and about, it just doesn’t come close to being what they need to get through this time,” said Roof.

Hector is among more than 2,000 restaurant and bar owners across the state who applied for assistance. She says any form of help during this time, no matter how big or small, is appreciated, and she’s grateful for the governor’s gesture.

“I feel like he’s done what he can possibly do”, she said. “Whether I get it or not, it’s other businesses that are going to be able to benefit from this.”

Stacey’s Donuts will not remain at its physical location on Factory Lane Road much longer, but Hector is transitioning to a food truck that is expected to be up and running by early next year.

“You know how the popsicle trucks go around different neighborhoods, that’s what I would like to do,” she said. “I would like to go around and have some music playing and sell some fresh donuts.”

For now, the shop will still offer delivery, participate in pop up shops, and prepare for the business’ next chapter.

The application deadline for the Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund is Dec. 18 or until all the funds are exhausted.

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