LMPD audit: Community trust, department morale both very low

This helped dozens of public safety and law enforcement agencies at all levels of government is among our nation’s leading public safety consulting firms. So I want to thank them for their work on this very thorough review and welcome their representative, Rob Davis, on the call with us. In a few moments, you will hear a summary of the report’s findings directly from Rob, and we’re putting the entire 150 plus page report up on our website today. It’s important to note that one of the things we’ve heard from Hillary Heinze is that our city is not alone. Policing is at a crossroads in America, in many, many cities, air asking how they can improve police community effectiveness. But of course, my focus is on our city, and this report shows us we have much work to do. I’m pleased to say the report found L M P D. To be in line with national best practices in many areas, including its de escalation, training and use of force continuum. And the report highlighted this energy project, which brings community stakeholders and L M. P T. Together for frank conversations about race is a promising program is, I said, though the nature of an audit is to expose gaps. And this audit clearly underscores the pain in our community as a whole and within L. M. P D. It validates the uncomfortable truth that many people of color in our city do not trust the police due to what the report describes as quote generations of problematic relations unquote. And it points out troubling disparities in arrest numbers in areas of inconsistency and training and leadership. At the same time, the report echoes what many police officers have told me that morale is low and they’re unsure they want to continue in their job. Some of the findings, frankly, can be hard to take, But the nature of an audit I want to emphasize this is to expose gaps so that we can address them. That’s what we want. Denial is not a strategy, and the report’s authors, air optimistic that our challenges can be resolved and that transformation is possible. With is, they say, a quote, renewed commitment unquote and holistic, follow through from L. M P. D. And city leaders, and, importantly, the community’s openness to the department, demonstrating a willingness to improve we should never underestimate our community’s willingness to come together to work on big projects. We’ve seen that time and again, and I’m really grateful for this strength. I’m optimistic, too, because despite critical findings, this report outlines of road map to the goals I’ve stated over and over rebuilding l impedes relationship with the community and increasing public trust while also improving morale, training and pride in the job throughout the Police department. All of this, as we pursue the goal of having the very best police department in the country, we should settle for nothing less. The bottom line change is necessary and I believe, welcomed by both the police Department and the broader community. It’s also important to recognize, as this report does, that we have already made a number of substantive changes over the past few months. Specifically, I signed Brianna’s Law to ban no knock warrants and mandate use of body cameras for officers searching serving search warrants. We’ve created a civilian police review board, an office of inspector general to add a new layer of independent review, toe LMP disciplinary matters, and we’re working to change state law to bolster this new system with subpoena power. We’re encouraging officers to volunteer in the neighborhoods they serve, and we established a housing credit program to incentivize officers to live within a qualified census track. We’re committed to establishing a system to have the best first responder on each call, whether it’s a social worker or a police officer. And after a national search. We have a new police chief, Erica Shields, who is committed to acting on these recommendations for reform and building trust, both in the Police Department and in the community. We took the steps I listed here and many others after listening and getting more feedback from you individuals, toe activists, business leaders, faith leaders and law enforcement Hillard Heinz has also been listening. Chief Hess will say more about this in a moment, but I’m extremely pleased with efforts they made to hear directly from the people of Louisville from Metro Council, from organizations and individuals representing our diverse city and from L. M. P. D. They surveyed the public and got nearly 8000 responses. They created a special email address for more community input, and they made on site visits where they conducted interviews, observed training and participated in ride alongs with police officers. It was important to us that the opinions and needs of the community, police and partners were a part of this process. Because we believe strongly that public safety is something we co produced. We must team up because Onley then will be seen as legitimate. Public safety is something we do together, not one party doing something to another. It’s also important that the community holds us accountable to the findings of this audit and receives regular reports on our progress. Chief s and Chief Shields are committed to doing this. So again, thank you to Hillary Heights and to all those who shared your experiences for this report. Now Amy Hess, our chief of public safety, will provide a little more detail about the process that led to this report. And then we will hear directly from Hillary Heights Chief s

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LMPD audit: Community trust, department morale both very low

The results are in. After more than seven months, a top-to-bottom review of the Louisville Metro Police Department is complete and the findings have been released.The mayor of Louisville was joined by LMPD personnel and the independent audit group Hillard Heintze to discuss the review on Thursday.It was requested back in June in the wake of the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor, David McAtee and the protests that followed.The major takeaways from the report: the department lacks community trust and has a severe morale issue.READ THE FULL REPORT HEREThe 155-page report includes 102 recommendations for the department, which the new chief, Erika Shields, pledged to implement as quickly as possible.She said there will be a team dedicated to measuring progress and says she will give regular public reports, “I intend to be successful and this report is the roadmap to success.”The mayor said the report clearly underscores the pain in the community as a whole and within LMPD. More challenges spelled out in the report included communication within the chain of command, recruiting and retention and high attrition’s effect on trained leadership and disparities in how Black residents are treated.“It validates the uncomfortable truth that many people of color in our city do not trust the police do to what the report describes as, quote, ‘generations of problematic relations,’” Fischer said.Auditors said Black people are more likely to be pulled over and more likely to be arrested than white residents.”It’s very clear there’s an issue that department needs to address in terms of how it interacts with the community. How people are being treated, how they’re explaining their actions. Also, to the degree that the department is bringing the community in to help determine what those policies and procedures will look like based on community wants, desires and needs,” Rob Davis with Hillard Heintze said.Fischer said the department is actually in line with many best practices across the country in the areas of de-escalation and use of force, two practices called into question following the death of Breonna Taylor. Davis said Louisville is not alone in facing many of the problems it is up against.He said he genuinely feels like leading and rank and file at LMPD are open to change and eager to embrace it.Some of the recommendations for change include overhauling internal practices and looking at crowd control policies. The department was urged to increase diversity in its ranks. Davis said the group behind the review was diverse. They conducted over 100 interviews with several different sectors of the community: LMPD employees of different ranks, county attorney, Metro Council, international community, faith community, ACLU and more.

The results are in. After more than seven months, a top-to-bottom review of the Louisville Metro Police Department is complete and the findings have been released.

The mayor of Louisville was joined by LMPD personnel and the independent audit group Hillard Heintze to discuss the review on Thursday.

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It was requested back in June in the wake of the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor, David McAtee and the protests that followed.

The major takeaways from the report: the department lacks community trust and has a severe morale issue.

READ THE FULL REPORT HERE

The 155-page report includes 102 recommendations for the department, which the new chief, Erika Shields, pledged to implement as quickly as possible.

She said there will be a team dedicated to measuring progress and says she will give regular public reports, “I intend to be successful and this report is the roadmap to success.”

The mayor said the report clearly underscores the pain in the community as a whole and within LMPD.

More challenges spelled out in the report included communication within the chain of command, recruiting and retention and high attrition’s effect on trained leadership and disparities in how Black residents are treated.

“It validates the uncomfortable truth that many people of color in our city do not trust the police do to what the report describes as, quote, ‘generations of problematic relations,’” Fischer said.

Auditors said Black people are more likely to be pulled over and more likely to be arrested than white residents.

“It’s very clear there’s an issue that department needs to address in terms of how it interacts with the community. How people are being treated, how they’re explaining their actions. Also, to the degree that the department is bringing the community in to help determine what those policies and procedures will look like based on community wants, desires and needs,” Rob Davis with Hillard Heintze said.

Fischer said the department is actually in line with many best practices across the country in the areas of de-escalation and use of force, two practices called into question following the death of Breonna Taylor.

Davis said Louisville is not alone in facing many of the problems it is up against.

He said he genuinely feels like leading and rank and file at LMPD are open to change and eager to embrace it.

Some of the recommendations for change include overhauling internal practices and looking at crowd control policies.

The department was urged to increase diversity in its ranks.

Davis said the group behind the review was diverse. They conducted over 100 interviews with several different sectors of the community: LMPD employees of different ranks, county attorney, Metro Council, international community, faith community, ACLU and more.

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