Four days after the election, the U.S. presidential race hovered in suspended animation Saturday morning until Democrat Joe Biden was declared the winner over President Donald Trump.The verdict delay can be attributed to high turnout, a massive number of mail-in ballots and slim margins between the two candidates. But Biden held leads in Pennsylvania, Nevada and Georgia through Saturday morning and was declared the winner in Pennsylvania and then of the election as a whole by the Associated Press around 11:30 a.m.See the latest updates below (all times Eastern): 3:45 p.m.President Donald Trump returned to the White House and a very different Washington, D.C., after losing his reelection bid.Trump’s motorcade returned from his golf club in Virginia via roads largely cleared of other cars and people Saturday afternoon.But as he approached the White House, he was welcomed home with boos and raised middle fingers. Chants of “Loser, loser, loser” and profanities were also heard as his motorcade drove by.Trump has so far refused to concede to President-elect Joe Biden and is promising legal challenges. He is the first president to lose reelection since George H.W. Bush in 1992.Editor’s note: The Associated Press has declared a winner in Arizona, however several other outlets have not yet. The race in Arizona is tightening, as more results are released. The AP continues to watch and analyze vote count results from Arizona as they come in, said Sally Buzbee, AP executive editor.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2:45 p.m. SaturdaySeveral hundred people gathered outside President Donald Trump’s Virginia golf club after his election loss to President-elect Joe Biden.The crowd includes dozens of Biden supporters celebrating his win, singing, “Hey hey hey, goodbye” and chanting, “Lock him up!” — a chant frequently heard at Trump rallies, directed at people he doesn’t like.There are also dozens of Trump supporters, many waving large Trump flags and chanting, “We love Trump!” A convoy of trucks festooned with pro-Trump and American flags has been driving up and down the street, with one driver jeering at the gathered press.There’s horn honking, cowbell ringing, whistle-blowing and plenty of cheering.Trump was golfing when a flurry of media outlets, including The Associated Press, declared Saturday morning that Biden had won the election.He is now on his way back to the White House.2:25 p.m. SaturdayCongressional Republican leaders have been notably silent on President-elect Joe Biden’s victory, but several GOP allies of President Donald Trump are disputing the outcome.Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri tweeted Saturday: “The media do not get to determine who the president is. The people do.” He added, “When all lawful votes have been counted, recounts finished, and allegations of fraud addressed, we will know who the winner is.”New outlets’ calling of the election are not official. The official count of electoral votes is held in a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, 2021.Other rank-and-file Republican lawmakers took a similar approach, insisting on waiting for some other verification of the results.“Voters decide who wins the election, not the media,” tweeted Republican Rep. Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma. “I fully support President Trump as he continues to fight for every legal vote to be counted.”Trump has so far refused to concede and is promising legal challenges. He is the first president to lose reelection since George H.W. Bush in 1992.1:10 p.m. SaturdayFormer President Barack Obama says he “could not be prouder” to congratulate President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.In a statement Saturday, Obama says Biden has “got what it takes to be president and already carries himself that way,” because he will enter the White House facing “a series of extraordinary challenges no incoming president ever has.”Acknowledging that the election revealed the nation remains bitterly divided, Obama said, “I know he’ll do the job with the best interests of every American at heart, whether or not he had their vote.”He adds: “I encourage every American to give him a chance and lend him your support.”Biden served as Obama’s vice president for two terms.12:58 p.m. SaturdayPresident-elect Joe Biden is planning to address the nation on Saturday night.His presidential campaign announced that Biden and his wife, Jill, and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff will appear at a drive-in rally outside the convention center in Wilmington, Delaware.Biden clinched the White House over President Donald Trump late Saturday morning with a victory in Pennsylvania, the state where he was born. He later added Nevada to his column for a total of 290 electoral votes with three states uncalled.The outdoor stage in Wilmington features projections of the Biden-Harris logo, colored lights and a line of towering American flags. Outside the security fence, people were already arriving with Biden campaign signs and chanting, “Joe! Joe!” and yelling, “We did it!” Cars in the area honked.12:17 p.m. SaturdayDemocrat Joe Biden has won Nevada, adding to his Electoral College victory over President Donald Trump, according to the AP.Biden clinched Nevada on Saturday afternoon, shortly after he won the presidency by taking Pennsylvania.Trump had made a strong play in Nevada, holding several rallies there in the final stretch of the campaign. Democrat Hillary Clinton narrowly won Nevada in 2016, and Republicans saw an opening to expand their electoral map.The pandemic has pummeled Nevada’s tourism-dependent economy, especially, hampering Trump’s ability to make inroads in the state.Nevada is also home to a large Hispanic population, a voting bloc that typically leans Democratic.The last Republican presidential candidate to win Nevada was George W. Bush in 2004.12:02 p.m. SaturdayPresident-elect Joe Biden released a statement after the Associated Press declared him the winner. Here is the full statement:”I am honored and humbled by the trust the American people have placed in me and in Vice President-elect Harris.In the face of unprecedented obstacles, a record number of Americans voted. Proving once again, that democracy beats deep in the heart of America.”With the campaign over, it’s time to put the anger and the harsh rhetoric behind us and come together as a nation.It’s time for America to unite. And to heal.”We are the United States of America. And there’s nothing we can’t do, if we do it together.”11:52 a.m. SaturdayPresident Donald Trump released a statement soon after the Associated Press called the race for Joe Biden.Here is the full statement:“We all know why Joe Biden is rushing to falsely pose as the winner, and why his media allies are trying so hard to help him: they don’t want the truth to be exposed. The simple fact is this election is far from over. Joe Biden has not been certified as the winner of any states, let alone any of the highly contested states headed for mandatory recounts, or states where our campaign has valid and legitimate legal challenges that could determine the ultimate victor. In Pennsylvania, for example, our legal observers were not permitted meaningful access to watch the counting process. Legal votes decide who is president, not the news media.“Beginning Monday, our campaign will start prosecuting our case in court to ensure election laws are fully upheld and the rightful winner is seated. The American People are entitled to an honest election: that means counting all legal ballots, and not counting any illegal ballots. This is the only way to ensure the public has full confidence in our election. It remains shocking that the Biden campaign refuses to agree with this basic principle and wants ballots counted even if they are fraudulent, manufactured, or cast by ineligible or deceased voters. Only a party engaged in wrongdoing would unlawfully keep observers out of the count room – and then fight in court to block their access. “So what is Biden hiding? I will not rest until the American People have the honest vote count they deserve and that Democracy demands.”11:30 a.m. SaturdayJoe Biden has defeated President Donald Trump and will become the 46th president of the United States, the Associated Press has declared.11:05 a.m. SaturdayPresident Donald Trump cut into Joe Biden’s lead in Arizona, lessening Biden’s lead by nearly 7,000 votes after Maricopa County, home to Phoenix, and others released results for a slew of new ballots.Biden’s lead was cut down to 20,573, according to the Associated Press, which declared Biden the winner in the state earlier in the week. In Maricopa County’s 11 a.m. ET update, Trump earned 26,992 votes to Biden’s 19,513 votes. It was the last large-scale release of ballot information expected from the state’s largest county.10 a.m. SaturdayPresident Trump took to Twitter as the results gradually expanded Joe Biden’s lead in must-win Pennsylvania. On Saturday, Trump repeated baseless allegations of election fraud and illegal voting, but they were quickly flagged as potentially misleading by the social media platform.8 a.m. SaturdayAs of 8 a.m. Saturday, the nation’s attention remains focused on states that are too close to call. There was intense focus on Pennsylvania, where Biden led Trump by nearly 29,000 votes, and Nevada, where the Democrat led by more than 22,000. In Georgia, Biden leads Trump by a thinner margin, just over 7,000. In Arizona, Biden leads by more than 29,000 votes.The prolonged wait added to the anxiety of a nation facing historic challenges, including the surging pandemic and deep political polarization. 7 a.m. Saturday In Pennsylvania, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald says between 20,000 to 23,000 mail-in ballots still need to be counted as of Saturday morning. Another round of updates from the area is expected by late morning or early afternoon.2 a.m. SaturdayVotes continue being counted in key states as Democrat Joe Biden teeters on the edge of 270 votes necessary to clinch a win. In Georgia and Pennsylvania, Biden maintained and expanded his lead over President Donald Trump. Election officials in both Philadelphia and Allegheny County, where Pittsburgh is located, stopped counting overnight and will resume in the morning. The races are too close to call at this point.In Nevada, votes continued being counted, with Biden’s lead expanding there as well. In Arizona, Trump made gains towards closing the gap between himself and the former vice president, though they were not enough to put him where he would need to be to flip the state. Votes are still being counted in those states as well. 10:54 p.m. FridayFormer Vice President Joe Biden spoke to supporters at Chase Center in Delaware, stopping short of declaring victory in the presidential race as he maintained a lead over President Donald Trump in key states, including Arizona, Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania. “We don’t have a final declaration, a victory yet,” he said. “But the numbers tell us a clear and convincing story.”Biden spoke about earning more than 74 million votes nationwide, the most in U.S. election history. Biden said he and Harris held meetings Thursday with leaders in public health and to discuss the “economic crisis” in the country. He addressed the increasing coronavirus cases around the country, which set a single-day high of more than 120,000 Thursday.“Our economic plan will put a focus on a plan for a strong recovery,” he said.“It’s time for us to come together as a nation to heal,” he said. “My responsibility as president will be to represent the whole nation. I want you to know that I will work as hard for those who voted against me as those who voted for me.” 10:08 p.m. FridayBoth of Georgia’s Senate seats will go to a January runoff after incumbent GOP Sen. David Perdue failed to garner 50% of the vote in the Peach State as ballots continued to be counted Friday, according to the AP.Perdue’s lead over Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff dwindled as Georgia counted mail-in and absentee ballots throughout the week.Georgia already was slated for a runoff between Democrat Raphael Warnock and incumbent GOP Sen. Kelly Loeffler. The two races are likely to determine the balance of power in the Senate two weeks before the presidential inauguration. The runoff elections will be Jan. 5.9:38 p.m. FridayJoe Biden’s lead over President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania grew to 27,174 as more mail-in and absentee ballots were counted and the counting of provisional ballots began, according to the Associated Press.Allegheny County executive Rich Fitzgerald said more than 9,000 combined military and damaged ballots had been counted. The number also included some of the 29,000 ballots that were resent after a third-party mailing company sent incorrect ballots to voters.Of the group of 9,288 counted ballots, 7,300 were for Biden and 1,875 were for Trump, Fitzgerald said.8:07 p.m. FridaySupreme Court Associate Justice Samuel Alito ordered all counties in Pennsylvania to count ballots received after Election Day but keep them separated from other ballots, the same guidance issued by Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar before the election.Pennsylvania Republicans had argued that ballots that arrived after election day should not be included in the state’s count. Boockvar’s guidance on separating the ballots that arrived after election day was issued on Oct. 28 and Nov. 1.Pennsylvania was accepting ballots postmarked on or before Election Day through 5 p.m. Friday.The order gave state officials until 2 p.m. Saturday to respond.The Pennsylvania secretary of state’s website said Friday night that there were 102,541 more mail ballots that needed to be counted, including many from Allegheny County, a Democratic area that is home to Pittsburgh, and the Democratic stronghold of Philadelphia County.Biden’s lead had increased to more than 20,000.7:11 p.m. FridayJoe Biden’s lead over President Donald Trump in Nevada has grown slightly, putting the former vice president ahead by 22,657 votes in the battleground state.The results Friday afternoon were mail-in ballots from Democrat-heavy Clark County, which includes Las Vegas and three-quarters of Nevada’s population.Biden had 632,558 votes, and Trump had 609,901. Vote counting in the state — and several other battlegrounds — is continuing.The latest results were among 63,000 mail ballots that workers began processing Friday morning. Clark County Registrar Joe Gloria said he expected the bulk would be processed by Sunday.Gloria has said an additional 60,000 provisional ballots will be processed later.6:45 p.m. FridayDavid Voye, elections manager for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, said the county had counted between 2,800 and 3,000 damaged ballots and two-thirds of the county’s military ballots as of Friday evening.Voye said the county was beginning to count the 29,000 ballots that were resent after a third-party mailing company sent out incorrect ballots. He said he could not estimate how long it would take to count the additional 29,000 ballots.Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald told CNN that of the 5,345 combined damaged and military ballots counted as of Friday evening, 4,134 were for Biden and 1,076 were for Trump.As of about 6:45 p.m., Joe Biden’s lead over President Donald Trump had increased to 17,053 in Pennsylvania, according to the Associated Press.Video: Allegheny County ballot update6:05 p.m. FridayJoe Biden is adding to his lead over President Donald Trump in Georgia.As of early Friday evening, Biden had overtaken Trump by 4,235 votes in the battleground state, which Trump must win to have a shot at reelection.The Democrat first surpassed Trump in the state vote count on Friday morning as votes continue to be counted.The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call.Secretary of State Brad Raffensperber said earlier Friday that a vote in the race will head to a recount due to the razor thin margins between Biden and Trump.5:17 p.m. FridayPennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar said Friday evening that the state had finished counting the “overwhelming majority” of mail-in and absentee ballots and had begun counting provisional ballots.Allegheny County began counting 29,000 mail-in ballots that a federal court ordered could not be counted until 5 p.m. Friday. The ballots originally were sent by the county’s third-party mailing company with the wrong information.As of about 5 p.m., Joe Biden held a 14,541 vote lead over Donald Trump, according to the Associated Press.3:30 p.m. FridayTop Republican officials in Georgia say they are confident the secretary of state will ensure that ballots are properly counted.The statement Friday from GOP Gov. Brian Kemp and others came a day after President Donald Trump alleged without any details or evidence that election officials are trying to “steal the election” from him.Trump said Thursday that the “election apparatus in Georgia is run by Democrats,” even though the top election official is a Republican whom he endorsed.Democrat Joe Biden was leading Trump in Georgia by about 1,500 votes midday Friday. The Associated Press has not called the race for either candidate yet.3:10 p.m. FridayThe federal agency that oversees U.S. election security is pushing back at unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud without mentioning that President Donald Trump is making unfounded allegations about the vote count.A new statement from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency notes that local election offices have detection measures that “make it highly difficult to commit fraud through counterfeit ballots.”CISA, a component of the Department of Homeland Security, published the statement Friday on a section of its website devoted to dispelling rumors. It said it was countering a rumor about the role of DHS and CISA in the printing of ballots and auditing of results. Neither agency has a role in printing or auditing ballots. CISA principally helps local and state election departments protect themselves against cyberattacks.CISA also put out a statement noting that the systems and processes used to tabulate votes and certify results “are protected by various safeguards that help ensure the accuracy of election results.”The agency has been urging the public for weeks to be patient during the counting of results, which was slower this year in large part because of COVID-19 and the large number of mail-in ballots. It has made no comment on Trump saying without evidence that the ballot-counting process is unfair and corrupt.2:50 p.m. FridayPennsylvania Republicans are turning to the U.S. Supreme Court to ask for an order that mail ballots arriving after Election Day in the battleground state be segregated. The state’s top elections official already had ordered those ballots be kept apart.The emergency request Friday came as Democrat Joe Biden inched ahead of President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania.The plea is part of an ongoing Republican appeal to the Supreme Court to try to keep ballots received in the mail after Election Day from being counted. The state’s top court granted a three-day extension, and the Supreme Court refused to block it.But Democratic Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar told local officials to keep the ballots separate because the high court hasn’t ultimately decided whether to step in.Republicans presented no evidence that counties are not adhering to Boockvar’s orders, but said, “It is unclear whether all county boards are following them in the post-election chaos.”The Associated Press has not declared a winner in the state.1:50 p.m. FridayPresident Donald Trump says he “will never give up fighting for you and our nation” as he is on the cusp of losing his bid for reelection.Trump is spending Friday at the White House tweeting, watching results come in and continuing to cast unfounded doubt over the integrity of the election.He says in a statement released by his campaign: “We believe the American people deserve to have full transparency into all vote counting and election certification.” And he adds that, “This is no longer about any single election. This is about the integrity of our entire election process.”There is no evidence that any votes cast illegally are being counted or that the process is unfair and corrupt. Indeed, the ballot-counting process across the country largely has been running smoothly, if slowly, because of the increase in mail-in ballots because of the coronavirus pandemic.But Trump is nonetheless threatening continued legal action, saying: “We will pursue this process through every aspect of the law to guarantee that the American people have confidence in our government.”Trump’s Democratic rival, Joe Biden, has opened up narrow leads over Trump in the critical battlegrounds of Georgia and Pennsylvania.1:15 p.m. FridayIn Nevada, Clark County Registrar Joe Gloria said that 63,000 mail-in ballots still need to be counted, along with 60,000 provision ballots that need to be reviewed and counted. There is another round of results expected to be released at 7 p.m. eastern, Gloria said.”Our goal here in Clark County is not to count fast,” he said. We want to make sure that we’re being accurate. The results in the state of Nevada obviously are going to be very important to the entire country. And that is our number one goal.”12:40 p.m. FridayJoe Biden’s campaign says he will give a speech during prime time Friday.The Democratic presidential candidate’s campaign announced that he would be making an address but did not say where or what he plans to say.Biden is on the cusp of winning the presidency as he opens up narrow leads over President Donald Trump in several critical backgrounds.The Associated Press has not called the presidential race. Votes are still being counted in states including Pennsylvania and Georgia.He has urged the public to be patient as vote counting continues. He was spending Friday at home in Wilmington, Delaware.A stage set up since election night for a victory party outside the city’s convention center remained intact and has been secured for days by security personnel using high fencing and car barriers.Biden campaign staffers who arrived in Wilmington for a victory party earlier in the week have been told to hold onto their hotel rooms until early next week.11:30 a.m. FridayIn a new batch of results coming in from Clark County, Nevada, Biden’s lead in that state has widened. The former vice president now leads President Trump by more than 22,000 votes in the Silver State.In Nevada, the vote count stands 624,246 votes for Biden and 602,170 for Trump. 11 a.m. FridayIn new numbers released from Arizona, the race between Joe Biden and President Donald Trump is narrowing. Biden currently leads by more than 43,000 votes. In the more than 60,000 ballots released Friday morning, more than 31,768 went for Trump and 28,285 went for Biden.An estimated 200,000 ballots still need to be counted in Arizona.As the numbers in Arizona came in, Pennsylvania continued to release new ballot counts. As of 11 a.m., Biden’s lead in the Keystone State has expanded to more than 9,400 votes.10:50 a.m. FridayGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperber said Friday that a vote in the presidential race in the Peach State will head to a recount due to the razor thin margins between Biden and Trump.Biden overtook the lead in the race early Friday morning and as of late Friday morning, remains ahead of Trump by 1,098 votes. There are still 4,169 ballots outstanding in Georgia, spread across four counties: 150 in Cherokee County, 75 in Cobb County, 444 in Floyd County and 3,500 in Gwinnett County.10 a.m. FridayBiden continues to extend his lead over Trump in Pennsylvania, with more than 6,800 votes separating the two. The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call. Votes in the state are still being counted.9 a.m. FridayJoe Biden has taken the lead from President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania by just over 5,500 votes. The state’s 20 Electoral College votes are a crucial path to victory for the campaigns. The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call.Trump’s lead dwindled after Election Day when state officials began processing mail-in ballots, a form of voting that has skewed heavily in Biden’s favor after Trump spent months claiming — without proof — that voting by mail would lead to widespread voter fraud.If there is less than a half percentage point difference between Biden’s and Trump’s vote totals, state law dictates that a recount must be held. 8:30 a.m. FridayJoe Biden is now leading President Donald Trump in the battleground state of Georgia.By Friday morning, Biden overtook Trump in the number of ballots counted in the battleground, a must-win state for Trump that has long been a Republican stronghold. Biden now has a 917-vote advantage.As of this writing, 8,197 ballots still need to be counted in Georgia: 4,800 in Gwinnett County; 444 in Floyd County; 1,797 in Laurens County; and 456 in Taylor County.The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call. Thousands of ballots are still left to be counted — many in counties where the former vice president was in the lead.An AP analysis showed that Biden’s vote margins grew as counties processed mail ballots cast in his favor.There is a potential that the race could go to a recount. Under Georgia law, if the margin between Biden and Trump is under half a percentage point of difference, a recount can be requested. 7:55 a.m. FridayToday at 11 a.m., Arizona plans to release additional results. The AP has called the state for Biden, but continues to keep a close eye on it as Trump has made gains.Georgia is continuing to release updated vote counts for mail-in ballots throughout the day. The state also plans to start providing results for provisional and military ballots. 3:30 a.m. FridayWhile the race continues, the president’s leads in key states, notably Georgia and Pennsylvania, have shrunk. It is still too early to call either of the states, however. The three other states that still have not been called — Nevada, Arizona and, often forgotten, Alaska — continue counting ballots. 1:30 a.m. FridayKey battleground states continued counting ballots through Thursday night. Georgia remained too close to call with the final ballots being counted, though the race is not expected to be called until Friday morning at the earliest. What ballots remained are in counties Biden has performed well in. North Carolina and Nevada also remained too early to call, with vote counts expected for the next couple of days. Pennsylvania still has hundred of thousands of outstanding ballots to count. President Trump held onto his lead through the evening, though it had dwindled considerably from his lead on Nov. 3 as mail-in ballots continue being counted.Mail-in ballots from across the state overwhelmingly broke in Biden’s direction, in part because Trump has spent much of the election cycle warning his own supporters without evidence that mail-in ballots are fraudulent.There’s also a possibility the race in Pennsylvania won’t be decided for days. If there is less than a half percentage point difference between Biden and Trump’s vote total, state law dictates that a recount must be held. 10:30 p.m. ThursdayIn Pennsylvania, hundreds of thousands of votes are still left to be counted. As of 10:30 p.m. Thursday, more than 208,000 mail-in votes still needed to be counted there, according to the state’s Votes PA dashboard. Trump, who held a 675,000-vote lead early Wednesday, prematurely declared victory in the state. By Thursday evening, the president’s lead had slipped to about 53,000 votes — and the race is expected to get tighter.One reason is because election officials are not allowed to process mail-in ballots until Election Day under state law. It’s a form of voting that has skewed heavily in Biden’s favor after Trump spent months claiming without proof that voting by mail would lead to widespread voter fraud.Mail ballots from across the state by Thursday evening overwhelming broke Biden’s direction.There’s also a possibility the race won’t be decided for days. If there is less than a half percentage point difference between Biden and Trump’s vote total, state law dictates that a recount must be held.8:50 p.m. ThursdayWhy the AP hasn’t called Georgia’s close raceTens of thousands of still-uncounted ballots — many in counties where Democrat Joe Biden was in the lead — are what’s making the Georgia contest between President Donald Trump and Biden too early to call.Trump and Biden were locked in a tight contest Thursday to secure the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency. Georgia is a must-win state for Trump, who has a narrower path to victory than Biden.Trump prematurely declared he was winning it early Wednesday morning. Yet by Thursday evening his lead over Biden had narrowed to less than 3,500 votes.THE DETAILSThe secretary of state’s office said Thursday evening that 18,936 absentee ballots still needed to be counted in seven counties.That did not include provisional ballots and absentee ballots that have to be “cured” before being scanned. Ballots cast before Election Day by military voters and citizens living overseas and received by 5 p.m. Friday also will be tallied.Additionally, Biden’s vote margins grew after a handful of rural pro-Trump counties processed mail ballots cast in his favor, an analysis by the AP showed.There is a potential that the race could go to a recount. Under Georgia law, if the margin between Biden and Trump is under half a percentage point of difference, a recount can be requested.8 p.m. ThursdayDemocrat Joe Biden says, “No one is going to take our democracy away from us.” His comment came after President Donald Trump’s unfounded claims that Democrats were trying to “steal” the presidential election from him.In a Thursday evening tweet, Biden says, “America has come too far, fought too many battles, and endured too much to let that happen.”The nation is waiting to learn whether Biden or Trump will collect the 270 electoral votes needed to capture the presidency. Biden’s victories in Michigan and Wisconsin have put him in a commanding position, but Trump has showed no sign of giving up.Speaking earlier Thursday from the White House, Trump did not back up his claim about Democrats with any details or evidence. State and federal officials have not reported any instances of widespread voter fraud.The ballot-counting process across the country has been running smoothly, and the count is ongoing in several battleground states.7:15 p.m. ThursdayPresident Donald Trump made his first public appearance since the early morning hours after Election Day and continued to peddle false accusations of “illegal votes” without evidence. Trump is renewing his unfounded claims that Democrats are trying to “steal” the election from him. He did not back up his claim with any details or evidence. State and federal officials have not reported any instances of widespread voter fraud.”If you count the legal votes, we won,” Trump said from the White House Briefing Room Thursday. “If you count the illegal vote, they can try to steal the election from us.”The president, as he did early Wednesday, falsely claimed he had won states where the race has not been called. He claimed that he’s won Pennsylvania by “a lot” but many mail-in ballots still need to be counted.While discussing mail-in ballots, Trump, again, falsely claimed mail-in ballots lead to voter fraud. To be clear, there is no evidence of voter fraud when it comes to mail-in ballots.The president’s repeated falsehoods from the White House came as judges in Georgia and Michigan quickly dismissed Trump campaign lawsuits, undercutting a campaign legal strategy to attack the integrity of the voting process in states where the result could mean Trump’s defeat.In this election, the court battles so far have been small-scale efforts to get a closer look at local elections officials as they process absentee ballots. A Michigan judge noted that the state’s ballot count is over as she tossed the campaign’s lawsuit.In Georgia, a state judge dismissed a case over concerns about 53 absentee ballots in Chatham County after elections officials in the Savannah-area county testified that all of those ballots had been received on time. Campaign officials said earlier they were considering similar challenges in a dozen other counties around the state.In Pennsylvania, meanwhile, the Trump campaign won an appellate ruling to get party and campaign observers closer to election workers who are processing mail-in ballots in Philadelphia.But the order did not affect the counting of ballots that is proceeding in Pennsylvania and elsewhere, as elections officials are dealing with an avalanche of mail ballots driven by fears of voting in person during a pandemic.The lawsuits in multiple states highlight that the Trump campaign could be confronting a political map in which it might have to persuade courts in two or more states to set aside enough votes to overturn the results. That’s a substantially different scenario than in the contested presidential election of 2000, which eventually was effectively settled by the Supreme Court, when the entire fight was over Florida’s electoral votes and involved a recount as opposed to trying to halt balloting.Trump last appeared in public early Wednesday, when he falsely declared victory over Democrat Joe Biden in the presidential race. Trump has also publicly called for vote counting to stop by citing baseless allegations of fraud and misconduct.The presidential race has not been called because neither Trump nor Biden has yet collected the requisite 270 Electoral College votes. 6 p.m. ThursdayA legal effort in Nevada by President Donald Trump’s campaign and state Republicans to try to stop the count of mail ballots in Las Vegas is over.A document submitted in an appeal pending before the state Supreme Court says the campaign, state GOP, Democrats and attorneys for the state have reached a settlement requiring Clark County election officials to supply “additional observation access” at a ballot processing facility in Las Vegas.The state high court declined on Election Day to stop the count based on an appeal of a state judge’s decision not to stop processing mail ballots in Las Vegas and surrounding Clark County — a Democratic stronghold in an otherwise red GOP state.In an order released Monday, Judge James Wilson Jr. in Carson City said he found neither the state nor Clark County had done anything to give one vote preference over another.Nevada Democrats accuse Republicans of trying to suppress voting in the state’s most diverse area.Trump campaign representatives said Thursday that they intended to file another complaint in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas to try to stop the counting of what state campaign co-chair Adam Laxalt called “improper votes.” That lawsuit was not immediately filed.5:50 p.m. ThursdayThe Trump campaign and Republican National Committee have asked an Arizona judge to let them join a lawsuit that alleges vote tabulation equipment in metro Phoenix was unable to record a voter’s ballot because she completed it with a county-issued Sharpie pen.They argued that anecdotal accounts of potential tabulation errors resulting from Sharpies demands further review and that they should be allowed to participate in the lawsuit because it will likely affect their interests in the tabulation of votes.The lawsuit seeks a court order for all Maricopa County voters whose ballots were rejected as a result of using a Sharpie to be given a chance to fix their ballots. It also asks for such voters to be able to be present while election officials count their ballots.The Arizona Democratic Party earlier asked to join the lawsuit, arguing that Democratic voters could be disenfranchised if the woman who filed the lawsuit was able to challenge a voter’s intent in making ballot choices without knowing the applicable standards.A judge is holding a hearing Thursday in Phoenix in the lawsuit by Phoenix-area voter Laurie Aguilera, who also alleged ink from the marker bled through the back side of her ballot and that poll workers refused her request for a new ballot.4:30 p.m. ThursdayBiden says he feels “very good” about the outcome of the presidential election and is telling his supporters to “stay calm” as votes continue to be counted.Biden delivered brief remarks Thursday at a theater in downtown Wilmington, Delaware. He says, “It is the will of the voters — no one, not anyone else — who chooses the president of the United States of America.”Trump’s campaign has pursued legal efforts to halt the vote counting in some states and is seeking a recount in Wisconsin.Biden says that “the process is working” and “we’ll know very soon” the outcome of the election. Biden and his top campaign officials have expressed confidence about the vote but have been careful to emphasize the need for every ballot to be counted.Biden’s running mate, California Sen. Kamala Harris, stood next to him as he spoke.The Associated Press has not called the presidential race yet because neither Biden nor Trump has secured the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory. Several key states remain too early to call — Pennsylvania, Georgia, North Carolina and Nevada. 3:35 p.m. ThursdayA federal judge in Washington, D.C., has ordered the U.S. Postal Service to perform twice daily sweeps of processing centers in states with extended ballot receipt deadlines to check for mail-in votes and to expedite them for delivery.Thursday’s order will remain in place until the end of states’ windows for accepting ballots.According to court records, a similar order by the same judge earlier this week found just 13 ballots in a search of 27 processing hubs in several battleground areas.Elections officials in key battleground states are continuing presidential vote counting. Democrat Joe Biden is urging patience, while President Donald Trump is pursing his legal options.Several key states are too early to call — Pennsylvania, Georgia, North Carolina and Nevada. 2:15 p.m. ThursdayThe Arizona Democratic Party has asked a court to let it participate in a lawsuit that alleges vote tabulation equipment in metro Phoenix was unable to record a voter’s ballot because she completed it with a county-issued Sharpie pen.A judge is holding a hearing Thursday in Phoenix in the lawsuit by voter Laurie Aguilera, who also alleged that ink from the marker bled through the back side of her ballot and that poll workers refused her request for a new ballot.Aguilera is seeking a court order for all Maricopa County voters whose ballots were rejected as a result of using a Sharpie to be given a chance to fix their ballots. She also is asking for such voters to be able to be present while election officials count their ballots.The Democrats say the lawsuit is based on the unconfirmed account of one voter and her request to monitor ballot processing could throw the processing of ballots in Arizona’s largest county in disarray.In a court filing, the party says Democratic voters could be disenfranchised if Aguilera and others were able to challenge a voter’s intent in making ballot choices without knowing the applicable standards.Arizona election officials have said voting with a Sharpie would have no impact on the votes being recorded by a tabulation machine.1:55 p.m. ThursdayAs the nation awaits results from Nevada, Clark County Registrar Joe Gloria says it could take until Saturday or Sunday before the state’s largest county finishes tallying mail-in ballots that have been returned.Gloria said Thursday at a press conference: “Our goal here in Clark County is not to count fast. We want to make sure that we’re being accurate.”Gloria says Clark County has at least 63,262 ballots left to count, including 34,743 returned in drop boxes on Election Day and 4,208 returned via the U.S. Postal Service. But as mail-in ballots postmarked by Election Day continue to trickle in, Gloria said he had no way of knowing the total number of outstanding ballots.He says, “That’s a number that I can’t give you. I can’t predict to you what’s going to come through the U.S. mail.”Gloria says the fact that Nevada’s six electoral votes could push Democrat Joe Biden beyond the 270 electoral vote threshold needed to win the presidency reaffirmed the need to not rush the count.He said the last day to count ballots is Nov. 12. 1:30 p.m. ThursdayA Michigan judge has dismissed a lawsuit by President Donald Trump’s campaign in a dispute over whether Republican challengers had access to the handling of absentee ballots.Judge Cynthia Stephens noted that the lawsuit was filed late Wednesday afternoon, just hours before the last ballots were counted. She also said the defendant, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, was the wrong person to sue because she doesn’t control the logistics of local ballot counting, even if she is the state’s chief election officer.The Associated Press called the Michigan presidential election for Democrat Joe Biden on Wednesday evening. Trump won the state in 2016.The lawsuit claimed Benson, a Democrat, was allowing absentee ballots to be counted without teams of bipartisan observers as well as challengers. She was accused of undermining the “constitutional right of all Michigan voters … to participate in fair and lawful elections.”Benson, through state attorneys, denied the allegations. Much of the dispute centered on the TCF Center in Detroit where pro-Trump protesters gathered while absentee ballots were being counted. 12:10 p.m. ThursdayNevada officials have released additional result information on the state website. Biden has an approximately 12,000 vote lead on Trump. It is unclear how much of the vote still needs to be counted.11:45 a.m. ThursdayA judge in Georgia has dismissed a lawsuit by the state Republican Party and President Donald Trump’s campaign that asked him to ensure a coastal county was following state laws on processing absentee ballots.Chatham County Superior Court Judge James Bass did not provide an explanation for his decision Thursday at the close of a roughly one-hour hearing. The county includes the heavily Democratic city of Savannah.The suit had raised concerns about 53 absentee ballots that poll observers said were not part of an original batch of ballots. County elections officials testified that all 53 ballots had been received on time.11:40 a.m. ThursdayMembers of the Trump campaign spoke in Nevada late this morning announcing they were filing a federal lawsuit in the state. They said they are filing this lawsuit to “protect legal voters,” claiming thousands of votes have been counted from people who do not live in Clark County, home to Las Vegas. There are no reports from Nevada election officials of voting irregularities or votes being counted from people who don’t live in the state. State officials plan to give an election update shortly.10:55 a.m. ThursdayArizona state officials say there are 375,000 ballots still to be counted in the Western battleground.The AP says it is monitoring that vote count as it comes in. The AP has called the presidential race in Arizona for Democrat Joe Biden, but several media outlets have said it’s still too close to call.AP executive editor Sally Buzbee says: “The Associated Press continues to watch and analyze vote count results from Arizona. We will follow the facts in all cases.”Biden holds a 2.35 percentage point lead over Trump in Arizona, an advantage of about 68,000 votes.4 a.m. ThursdayThere are still a handful of states that have not released their final results. They are Nevada, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Alaska, Georgia and Arizona. The Associated Press has called Arizona for Biden, though most other news outlets have not.Check back here as we report on major updates. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Four days after the election, the U.S. presidential race hovered in suspended animation Saturday morning until Democrat Joe Biden was declared the winner over President Donald Trump.

The verdict delay can be attributed to high turnout, a massive number of mail-in ballots and slim margins between the two candidates.

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But Biden held leads in Pennsylvania, Nevada and Georgia through Saturday morning and was declared the winner in Pennsylvania and then of the election as a whole by the Associated Press around 11:30 a.m.

See the latest updates below (all times Eastern):

3:45 p.m.
President Donald Trump returned to the White House and a very different Washington, D.C., after losing his reelection bid.

Trump’s motorcade returned from his golf club in Virginia via roads largely cleared of other cars and people Saturday afternoon.

But as he approached the White House, he was welcomed home with boos and raised middle fingers. Chants of “Loser, loser, loser” and profanities were also heard as his motorcade drove by.

Trump has so far refused to concede to President-elect Joe Biden and is promising legal challenges. He is the first president to lose reelection since George H.W. Bush in 1992.

Editor’s note: The Associated Press has declared a winner in Arizona, however several other outlets have not yet. The race in Arizona is tightening, as more results are released. The AP continues to watch and analyze vote count results from Arizona as they come in, said Sally Buzbee, AP executive editor.

2:45 p.m. Saturday

Several hundred people gathered outside President Donald Trump’s Virginia golf club after his election loss to President-elect Joe Biden.

The crowd includes dozens of Biden supporters celebrating his win, singing, “Hey hey hey, goodbye” and chanting, “Lock him up!” — a chant frequently heard at Trump rallies, directed at people he doesn’t like.

There are also dozens of Trump supporters, many waving large Trump flags and chanting, “We love Trump!” A convoy of trucks festooned with pro-Trump and American flags has been driving up and down the street, with one driver jeering at the gathered press.

There’s horn honking, cowbell ringing, whistle-blowing and plenty of cheering.
Trump was golfing when a flurry of media outlets, including The Associated Press, declared Saturday morning that Biden had won the election.

He is now on his way back to the White House.

2:25 p.m. Saturday

Congressional Republican leaders have been notably silent on President-elect Joe Biden’s victory, but several GOP allies of President Donald Trump are disputing the outcome.

Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri tweeted Saturday: “The media do not get to determine who the president is. The people do.” He added, “When all lawful votes have been counted, recounts finished, and allegations of fraud addressed, we will know who the winner is.”

New outlets’ calling of the election are not official. The official count of electoral votes is held in a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, 2021.

Other rank-and-file Republican lawmakers took a similar approach, insisting on waiting for some other verification of the results.

“Voters decide who wins the election, not the media,” tweeted Republican Rep. Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma. “I fully support President Trump as he continues to fight for every legal vote to be counted.”

Trump has so far refused to concede and is promising legal challenges. He is the first president to lose reelection since George H.W. Bush in 1992.

1:10 p.m. Saturday

Former President Barack Obama says he “could not be prouder” to congratulate President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.

In a statement Saturday, Obama says Biden has “got what it takes to be president and already carries himself that way,” because he will enter the White House facing “a series of extraordinary challenges no incoming president ever has.”

Acknowledging that the election revealed the nation remains bitterly divided, Obama said, “I know he’ll do the job with the best interests of every American at heart, whether or not he had their vote.”

He adds: “I encourage every American to give him a chance and lend him your support.”
Biden served as Obama’s vice president for two terms.

12:58 p.m. Saturday

President-elect Joe Biden is planning to address the nation on Saturday night.

His presidential campaign announced that Biden and his wife, Jill, and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff will appear at a drive-in rally outside the convention center in Wilmington, Delaware.

Biden clinched the White House over President Donald Trump late Saturday morning with a victory in Pennsylvania, the state where he was born. He later added Nevada to his column for a total of 290 electoral votes with three states uncalled.

The outdoor stage in Wilmington features projections of the Biden-Harris logo, colored lights and a line of towering American flags. Outside the security fence, people were already arriving with Biden campaign signs and chanting, “Joe! Joe!” and yelling, “We did it!” Cars in the area honked.

12:17 p.m. Saturday

Democrat Joe Biden has won Nevada, adding to his Electoral College victory over President Donald Trump, according to the AP.

Biden clinched Nevada on Saturday afternoon, shortly after he won the presidency by taking Pennsylvania.

Trump had made a strong play in Nevada, holding several rallies there in the final stretch of the campaign. Democrat Hillary Clinton narrowly won Nevada in 2016, and Republicans saw an opening to expand their electoral map.

The pandemic has pummeled Nevada’s tourism-dependent economy, especially, hampering Trump’s ability to make inroads in the state.

Nevada is also home to a large Hispanic population, a voting bloc that typically leans Democratic.

The last Republican presidential candidate to win Nevada was George W. Bush in 2004.

12:02 p.m. Saturday

President-elect Joe Biden released a statement after the Associated Press declared him the winner.

Here is the full statement:

“I am honored and humbled by the trust the American people have placed in me and in Vice President-elect Harris.

In the face of unprecedented obstacles, a record number of Americans voted. Proving once again, that democracy beats deep in the heart of America.

“With the campaign over, it’s time to put the anger and the harsh rhetoric behind us and come together as a nation.
It’s time for America to unite. And to heal.

“We are the United States of America. And there’s nothing we can’t do, if we do it together.”

11:52 a.m. Saturday

President Donald Trump released a statement soon after the Associated Press called the race for Joe Biden.

Here is the full statement:

“We all know why Joe Biden is rushing to falsely pose as the winner, and why his media allies are trying so hard to help him: they don’t want the truth to be exposed. The simple fact is this election is far from over. Joe Biden has not been certified as the winner of any states, let alone any of the highly contested states headed for mandatory recounts, or states where our campaign has valid and legitimate legal challenges that could determine the ultimate victor. In Pennsylvania, for example, our legal observers were not permitted meaningful access to watch the counting process. Legal votes decide who is president, not the news media.

“Beginning Monday, our campaign will start prosecuting our case in court to ensure election laws are fully upheld and the rightful winner is seated. The American People are entitled to an honest election: that means counting all legal ballots, and not counting any illegal ballots. This is the only way to ensure the public has full confidence in our election. It remains shocking that the Biden campaign refuses to agree with this basic principle and wants ballots counted even if they are fraudulent, manufactured, or cast by ineligible or deceased voters. Only a party engaged in wrongdoing would unlawfully keep observers out of the count room – and then fight in court to block their access.

“So what is Biden hiding? I will not rest until the American People have the honest vote count they deserve and that Democracy demands.”

11:30 a.m. Saturday

Joe Biden has defeated President Donald Trump and will become the 46th president of the United States, the Associated Press has declared.

11:05 a.m. Saturday

President Donald Trump cut into Joe Biden’s lead in Arizona, lessening Biden’s lead by nearly 7,000 votes after Maricopa County, home to Phoenix, and others released results for a slew of new ballots.

Biden’s lead was cut down to 20,573, according to the Associated Press, which declared Biden the winner in the state earlier in the week.

In Maricopa County’s 11 a.m. ET update, Trump earned 26,992 votes to Biden’s 19,513 votes.

It was the last large-scale release of ballot information expected from the state’s largest county.

10 a.m. Saturday

President Trump took to Twitter as the results gradually expanded Joe Biden’s lead in must-win Pennsylvania. On Saturday, Trump repeated baseless allegations of election fraud and illegal voting, but they were quickly flagged as potentially misleading by the social media platform.

8 a.m. Saturday

As of 8 a.m. Saturday, the nation’s attention remains focused on states that are too close to call. There was intense focus on Pennsylvania, where Biden led Trump by nearly 29,000 votes, and Nevada, where the Democrat led by more than 22,000. In Georgia, Biden leads Trump by a thinner margin, just over 7,000. In Arizona, Biden leads by more than 29,000 votes.

The prolonged wait added to the anxiety of a nation facing historic challenges, including the surging pandemic and deep political polarization.

7 a.m. Saturday

In Pennsylvania, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald says between 20,000 to 23,000 mail-in ballots still need to be counted as of Saturday morning. Another round of updates from the area is expected by late morning or early afternoon.

2 a.m. Saturday

Votes continue being counted in key states as Democrat Joe Biden teeters on the edge of 270 votes necessary to clinch a win. In Georgia and Pennsylvania, Biden maintained and expanded his lead over President Donald Trump. Election officials in both Philadelphia and Allegheny County, where Pittsburgh is located, stopped counting overnight and will resume in the morning. The races are too close to call at this point.

In Nevada, votes continued being counted, with Biden’s lead expanding there as well. In Arizona, Trump made gains towards closing the gap between himself and the former vice president, though they were not enough to put him where he would need to be to flip the state. Votes are still being counted in those states as well.

10:54 p.m. Friday
Former Vice President Joe Biden spoke to supporters at Chase Center in Delaware, stopping short of declaring victory in the presidential race as he maintained a lead over President Donald Trump in key states, including Arizona, Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania.

“We don’t have a final declaration, a victory yet,” he said. “But the numbers tell us a clear and convincing story.”

Biden spoke about earning more than 74 million votes nationwide, the most in U.S. election history.

Biden said he and Harris held meetings Thursday with leaders in public health and to discuss the “economic crisis” in the country. He addressed the increasing coronavirus cases around the country, which set a single-day high of more than 120,000 Thursday.

“Our economic plan will put a focus on a plan for a strong recovery,” he said.

“It’s time for us to come together as a nation to heal,” he said. “My responsibility as president will be to represent the whole nation. I want you to know that I will work as hard for those who voted against me as those who voted for me.”

10:08 p.m. Friday

Both of Georgia’s Senate seats will go to a January runoff after incumbent GOP Sen. David Perdue failed to garner 50% of the vote in the Peach State as ballots continued to be counted Friday, according to the AP.

Perdue’s lead over Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff dwindled as Georgia counted mail-in and absentee ballots throughout the week.

Georgia already was slated for a runoff between Democrat Raphael Warnock and incumbent GOP Sen. Kelly Loeffler. The two races are likely to determine the balance of power in the Senate two weeks before the presidential inauguration. The runoff elections will be Jan. 5.

9:38 p.m. Friday

Joe Biden’s lead over President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania grew to 27,174 as more mail-in and absentee ballots were counted and the counting of provisional ballots began, according to the Associated Press.

Allegheny County executive Rich Fitzgerald said more than 9,000 combined military and damaged ballots had been counted. The number also included some of the 29,000 ballots that were resent after a third-party mailing company sent incorrect ballots to voters.

Of the group of 9,288 counted ballots, 7,300 were for Biden and 1,875 were for Trump, Fitzgerald said.

8:07 p.m. Friday

Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel Alito ordered all counties in Pennsylvania to count ballots received after Election Day but keep them separated from other ballots, the same guidance issued by Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar before the election.

Pennsylvania Republicans had argued that ballots that arrived after election day should not be included in the state’s count. Boockvar’s guidance on separating the ballots that arrived after election day was issued on Oct. 28 and Nov. 1.

Pennsylvania was accepting ballots postmarked on or before Election Day through 5 p.m. Friday.

The order gave state officials until 2 p.m. Saturday to respond.

The Pennsylvania secretary of state’s website said Friday night that there were 102,541 more mail ballots that needed to be counted, including many from Allegheny County, a Democratic area that is home to Pittsburgh, and the Democratic stronghold of Philadelphia County.

Biden’s lead had increased to more than 20,000.

7:11 p.m. Friday

Joe Biden’s lead over President Donald Trump in Nevada has grown slightly, putting the former vice president ahead by 22,657 votes in the battleground state.

The results Friday afternoon were mail-in ballots from Democrat-heavy Clark County, which includes Las Vegas and three-quarters of Nevada’s population.

Biden had 632,558 votes, and Trump had 609,901. Vote counting in the state — and several other battlegrounds — is continuing.

The latest results were among 63,000 mail ballots that workers began processing Friday morning. Clark County Registrar Joe Gloria said he expected the bulk would be processed by Sunday.

Gloria has said an additional 60,000 provisional ballots will be processed later.

6:45 p.m. Friday

David Voye, elections manager for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, said the county had counted between 2,800 and 3,000 damaged ballots and two-thirds of the county’s military ballots as of Friday evening.

Voye said the county was beginning to count the 29,000 ballots that were resent after a third-party mailing company sent out incorrect ballots. He said he could not estimate how long it would take to count the additional 29,000 ballots.

Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald told CNN that of the 5,345 combined damaged and military ballots counted as of Friday evening, 4,134 were for Biden and 1,076 were for Trump.

As of about 6:45 p.m., Joe Biden’s lead over President Donald Trump had increased to 17,053 in Pennsylvania, according to the Associated Press.

Video: Allegheny County ballot update

6:05 p.m. Friday

Joe Biden is adding to his lead over President Donald Trump in Georgia.

As of early Friday evening, Biden had overtaken Trump by 4,235 votes in the battleground state, which Trump must win to have a shot at reelection.

The Democrat first surpassed Trump in the state vote count on Friday morning as votes continue to be counted.

The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call.

Secretary of State Brad Raffensperber said earlier Friday that a vote in the race will head to a recount due to the razor thin margins between Biden and Trump.

5:17 p.m. Friday

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar said Friday evening that the state had finished counting the “overwhelming majority” of mail-in and absentee ballots and had begun counting provisional ballots.

Allegheny County began counting 29,000 mail-in ballots that a federal court ordered could not be counted until 5 p.m. Friday. The ballots originally were sent by the county’s third-party mailing company with the wrong information.

As of about 5 p.m., Joe Biden held a 14,541 vote lead over Donald Trump, according to the Associated Press.

3:30 p.m. Friday

Top Republican officials in Georgia say they are confident the secretary of state will ensure that ballots are properly counted.

The statement Friday from GOP Gov. Brian Kemp and others came a day after President Donald Trump alleged without any details or evidence that election officials are trying to “steal the election” from him.

Trump said Thursday that the “election apparatus in Georgia is run by Democrats,” even though the top election official is a Republican whom he endorsed.

Democrat Joe Biden was leading Trump in Georgia by about 1,500 votes midday Friday. The Associated Press has not called the race for either candidate yet.

3:10 p.m. Friday

The federal agency that oversees U.S. election security is pushing back at unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud without mentioning that President Donald Trump is making unfounded allegations about the vote count.

A new statement from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency notes that local election offices have detection measures that “make it highly difficult to commit fraud through counterfeit ballots.”

CISA, a component of the Department of Homeland Security, published the statement Friday on a section of its website devoted to dispelling rumors. It said it was countering a rumor about the role of DHS and CISA in the printing of ballots and auditing of results. Neither agency has a role in printing or auditing ballots. CISA principally helps local and state election departments protect themselves against cyberattacks.

CISA also put out a statement noting that the systems and processes used to tabulate votes and certify results “are protected by various safeguards that help ensure the accuracy of election results.”

The agency has been urging the public for weeks to be patient during the counting of results, which was slower this year in large part because of COVID-19 and the large number of mail-in ballots. It has made no comment on Trump saying without evidence that the ballot-counting process is unfair and corrupt.

2:50 p.m. Friday

Pennsylvania Republicans are turning to the U.S. Supreme Court to ask for an order that mail ballots arriving after Election Day in the battleground state be segregated. The state’s top elections official already had ordered those ballots be kept apart.

The emergency request Friday came as Democrat Joe Biden inched ahead of President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania.

The plea is part of an ongoing Republican appeal to the Supreme Court to try to keep ballots received in the mail after Election Day from being counted. The state’s top court granted a three-day extension, and the Supreme Court refused to block it.

But Democratic Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar told local officials to keep the ballots separate because the high court hasn’t ultimately decided whether to step in.

Republicans presented no evidence that counties are not adhering to Boockvar’s orders, but said, “It is unclear whether all county boards are following them in the post-election chaos.”

The Associated Press has not declared a winner in the state.

1:50 p.m. Friday
President Donald Trump says he “will never give up fighting for you and our nation” as he is on the cusp of losing his bid for reelection.

Trump is spending Friday at the White House tweeting, watching results come in and continuing to cast unfounded doubt over the integrity of the election.

He says in a statement released by his campaign: “We believe the American people deserve to have full transparency into all vote counting and election certification.” And he adds that, “This is no longer about any single election. This is about the integrity of our entire election process.”

There is no evidence that any votes cast illegally are being counted or that the process is unfair and corrupt. Indeed, the ballot-counting process across the country largely has been running smoothly, if slowly, because of the increase in mail-in ballots because of the coronavirus pandemic.

But Trump is nonetheless threatening continued legal action, saying: “We will pursue this process through every aspect of the law to guarantee that the American people have confidence in our government.”

Trump’s Democratic rival, Joe Biden, has opened up narrow leads over Trump in the critical battlegrounds of Georgia and Pennsylvania.

1:15 p.m. Friday

In Nevada, Clark County Registrar Joe Gloria said that 63,000 mail-in ballots still need to be counted, along with 60,000 provision ballots that need to be reviewed and counted. There is another round of results expected to be released at 7 p.m. eastern, Gloria said.

“Our goal here in Clark County is not to count fast,” he said. We want to make sure that we’re being accurate. The results in the state of Nevada obviously are going to be very important to the entire country. And that is our number one goal.”

12:40 p.m. Friday

Joe Biden’s campaign says he will give a speech during prime time Friday.

The Democratic presidential candidate’s campaign announced that he would be making an address but did not say where or what he plans to say.

Biden is on the cusp of winning the presidency as he opens up narrow leads over President Donald Trump in several critical backgrounds.

The Associated Press has not called the presidential race. Votes are still being counted in states including Pennsylvania and Georgia.

He has urged the public to be patient as vote counting continues. He was spending Friday at home in Wilmington, Delaware.

A stage set up since election night for a victory party outside the city’s convention center remained intact and has been secured for days by security personnel using high fencing and car barriers.

Biden campaign staffers who arrived in Wilmington for a victory party earlier in the week have been told to hold onto their hotel rooms until early next week.

11:30 a.m. Friday

In a new batch of results coming in from Clark County, Nevada, Biden’s lead in that state has widened. The former vice president now leads President Trump by more than 22,000 votes in the Silver State.

In Nevada, the vote count stands 624,246 votes for Biden and 602,170 for Trump.

11 a.m. Friday

In new numbers released from Arizona, the race between Joe Biden and President Donald Trump is narrowing. Biden currently leads by more than 43,000 votes. In the more than 60,000 ballots released Friday morning, more than 31,768 went for Trump and 28,285 went for Biden.

An estimated 200,000 ballots still need to be counted in Arizona.

As the numbers in Arizona came in, Pennsylvania continued to release new ballot counts. As of 11 a.m., Biden’s lead in the Keystone State has expanded to more than 9,400 votes.

10:50 a.m. Friday

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperber said Friday that a vote in the presidential race in the Peach State will head to a recount due to the razor thin margins between Biden and Trump.

Biden overtook the lead in the race early Friday morning and as of late Friday morning, remains ahead of Trump by 1,098 votes. There are still 4,169 ballots outstanding in Georgia, spread across four counties: 150 in Cherokee County, 75 in Cobb County, 444 in Floyd County and 3,500 in Gwinnett County.

10 a.m. Friday

Biden continues to extend his lead over Trump in Pennsylvania, with more than 6,800 votes separating the two.

The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call. Votes in the state are still being counted.

9 a.m. Friday

Joe Biden has taken the lead from President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania by just over 5,500 votes. The state’s 20 Electoral College votes are a crucial path to victory for the campaigns. The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call.

Trump’s lead dwindled after Election Day when state officials began processing mail-in ballots, a form of voting that has skewed heavily in Biden’s favor after Trump spent months claiming — without proof — that voting by mail would lead to widespread voter fraud.

If there is less than a half percentage point difference between Biden’s and Trump’s vote totals, state law dictates that a recount must be held.

8:30 a.m. Friday

Joe Biden is now leading President Donald Trump in the battleground state of Georgia.

By Friday morning, Biden overtook Trump in the number of ballots counted in the battleground, a must-win state for Trump that has long been a Republican stronghold. Biden now has a 917-vote advantage.

As of this writing, 8,197 ballots still need to be counted in Georgia: 4,800 in Gwinnett County; 444 in Floyd County; 1,797 in Laurens County; and 456 in Taylor County.

The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call. Thousands of ballots are still left to be counted — many in counties where the former vice president was in the lead.

An AP analysis showed that Biden’s vote margins grew as counties processed mail ballots cast in his favor.

There is a potential that the race could go to a recount. Under Georgia law, if the margin between Biden and Trump is under half a percentage point of difference, a recount can be requested.

7:55 a.m. Friday

Today at 11 a.m., Arizona plans to release additional results. The AP has called the state for Biden, but continues to keep a close eye on it as Trump has made gains.

Georgia is continuing to release updated vote counts for mail-in ballots throughout the day. The state also plans to start providing results for provisional and military ballots.

3:30 a.m. Friday

While the race continues, the president’s leads in key states, notably Georgia and Pennsylvania, have shrunk. It is still too early to call either of the states, however.

The three other states that still have not been called — Nevada, Arizona and, often forgotten, Alaska — continue counting ballots.

1:30 a.m. Friday

Key battleground states continued counting ballots through Thursday night.

Georgia remained too close to call with the final ballots being counted, though the race is not expected to be called until Friday morning at the earliest. What ballots remained are in counties Biden has performed well in.

North Carolina and Nevada also remained too early to call, with vote counts expected for the next couple of days.

Pennsylvania still has hundred of thousands of outstanding ballots to count. President Trump held onto his lead through the evening, though it had dwindled considerably from his lead on Nov. 3 as mail-in ballots continue being counted.

Mail-in ballots from across the state overwhelmingly broke in Biden’s direction, in part because Trump has spent much of the election cycle warning his own supporters without evidence that mail-in ballots are fraudulent.

There’s also a possibility the race in Pennsylvania won’t be decided for days. If there is less than a half percentage point difference between Biden and Trump’s vote total, state law dictates that a recount must be held.

10:30 p.m. Thursday

In Pennsylvania, hundreds of thousands of votes are still left to be counted. As of 10:30 p.m. Thursday, more than 208,000 mail-in votes still needed to be counted there, according to the state’s Votes PA dashboard.

Trump, who held a 675,000-vote lead early Wednesday, prematurely declared victory in the state.

By Thursday evening, the president’s lead had slipped to about 53,000 votes — and the race is expected to get tighter.

One reason is because election officials are not allowed to process mail-in ballots until Election Day under state law. It’s a form of voting that has skewed heavily in Biden’s favor after Trump spent months claiming without proof that voting by mail would lead to widespread voter fraud.

Mail ballots from across the state by Thursday evening overwhelming broke Biden’s direction.

There’s also a possibility the race won’t be decided for days. If there is less than a half percentage point difference between Biden and Trump’s vote total, state law dictates that a recount must be held.

8:50 p.m. Thursday

Why the AP hasn’t called Georgia’s close race

Tens of thousands of still-uncounted ballots — many in counties where Democrat Joe Biden was in the lead — are what’s making the Georgia contest between President Donald Trump and Biden too early to call.

Trump and Biden were locked in a tight contest Thursday to secure the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency. Georgia is a must-win state for Trump, who has a narrower path to victory than Biden.

Trump prematurely declared he was winning it early Wednesday morning. Yet by Thursday evening his lead over Biden had narrowed to less than 3,500 votes.

THE DETAILS

The secretary of state’s office said Thursday evening that 18,936 absentee ballots still needed to be counted in seven counties.

That did not include provisional ballots and absentee ballots that have to be “cured” before being scanned. Ballots cast before Election Day by military voters and citizens living overseas and received by 5 p.m. Friday also will be tallied.

Additionally, Biden’s vote margins grew after a handful of rural pro-Trump counties processed mail ballots cast in his favor, an analysis by the AP showed.

There is a potential that the race could go to a recount. Under Georgia law, if the margin between Biden and Trump is under half a percentage point of difference, a recount can be requested.

8 p.m. Thursday

Democrat Joe Biden says, “No one is going to take our democracy away from us.” His comment came after President Donald Trump’s unfounded claims that Democrats were trying to “steal” the presidential election from him.

In a Thursday evening tweet, Biden says, “America has come too far, fought too many battles, and endured too much to let that happen.”

The nation is waiting to learn whether Biden or Trump will collect the 270 electoral votes needed to capture the presidency. Biden’s victories in Michigan and Wisconsin have put him in a commanding position, but Trump has showed no sign of giving up.

Speaking earlier Thursday from the White House, Trump did not back up his claim about Democrats with any details or evidence. State and federal officials have not reported any instances of widespread voter fraud.

The ballot-counting process across the country has been running smoothly, and the count is ongoing in several battleground states.

7:15 p.m. Thursday

President Donald Trump made his first public appearance since the early morning hours after Election Day and continued to peddle false accusations of “illegal votes” without evidence.

Trump is renewing his unfounded claims that Democrats are trying to “steal” the election from him. He did not back up his claim with any details or evidence. State and federal officials have not reported any instances of widespread voter fraud.

“If you count the legal votes, we won,” Trump said from the White House Briefing Room Thursday. “If you count the illegal vote, they can try to steal the election from us.”

The president, as he did early Wednesday, falsely claimed he had won states where the race has not been called.

He claimed that he’s won Pennsylvania by “a lot” but many mail-in ballots still need to be counted.

While discussing mail-in ballots, Trump, again, falsely claimed mail-in ballots lead to voter fraud. To be clear, there is no evidence of voter fraud when it comes to mail-in ballots.

The president’s repeated falsehoods from the White House came as judges in Georgia and Michigan quickly dismissed Trump campaign lawsuits, undercutting a campaign legal strategy to attack the integrity of the voting process in states where the result could mean Trump’s defeat.

In this election, the court battles so far have been small-scale efforts to get a closer look at local elections officials as they process absentee ballots. A Michigan judge noted that the state’s ballot count is over as she tossed the campaign’s lawsuit.

In Georgia, a state judge dismissed a case over concerns about 53 absentee ballots in Chatham County after elections officials in the Savannah-area county testified that all of those ballots had been received on time. Campaign officials said earlier they were considering similar challenges in a dozen other counties around the state.

In Pennsylvania, meanwhile, the Trump campaign won an appellate ruling to get party and campaign observers closer to election workers who are processing mail-in ballots in Philadelphia.

But the order did not affect the counting of ballots that is proceeding in Pennsylvania and elsewhere, as elections officials are dealing with an avalanche of mail ballots driven by fears of voting in person during a pandemic.

The lawsuits in multiple states highlight that the Trump campaign could be confronting a political map in which it might have to persuade courts in two or more states to set aside enough votes to overturn the results. That’s a substantially different scenario than in the contested presidential election of 2000, which eventually was effectively settled by the Supreme Court, when the entire fight was over Florida’s electoral votes and involved a recount as opposed to trying to halt balloting.

Trump last appeared in public early Wednesday, when he falsely declared victory over Democrat Joe Biden in the presidential race. Trump has also publicly called for vote counting to stop by citing baseless allegations of fraud and misconduct.

The presidential race has not been called because neither Trump nor Biden has yet collected the requisite 270 Electoral College votes.

6 p.m. Thursday

A legal effort in Nevada by President Donald Trump’s campaign and state Republicans to try to stop the count of mail ballots in Las Vegas is over.

A document submitted in an appeal pending before the state Supreme Court says the campaign, state GOP, Democrats and attorneys for the state have reached a settlement requiring Clark County election officials to supply “additional observation access” at a ballot processing facility in Las Vegas.

The state high court declined on Election Day to stop the count based on an appeal of a state judge’s decision not to stop processing mail ballots in Las Vegas and surrounding Clark County — a Democratic stronghold in an otherwise red GOP state.

In an order released Monday, Judge James Wilson Jr. in Carson City said he found neither the state nor Clark County had done anything to give one vote preference over another.

Nevada Democrats accuse Republicans of trying to suppress voting in the state’s most diverse area.

Trump campaign representatives said Thursday that they intended to file another complaint in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas to try to stop the counting of what state campaign co-chair Adam Laxalt called “improper votes.” That lawsuit was not immediately filed.

5:50 p.m. Thursday

The Trump campaign and Republican National Committee have asked an Arizona judge to let them join a lawsuit that alleges vote tabulation equipment in metro Phoenix was unable to record a voter’s ballot because she completed it with a county-issued Sharpie pen.

They argued that anecdotal accounts of potential tabulation errors resulting from Sharpies demands further review and that they should be allowed to participate in the lawsuit because it will likely affect their interests in the tabulation of votes.

The lawsuit seeks a court order for all Maricopa County voters whose ballots were rejected as a result of using a Sharpie to be given a chance to fix their ballots. It also asks for such voters to be able to be present while election officials count their ballots.

The Arizona Democratic Party earlier asked to join the lawsuit, arguing that Democratic voters could be disenfranchised if the woman who filed the lawsuit was able to challenge a voter’s intent in making ballot choices without knowing the applicable standards.

A judge is holding a hearing Thursday in Phoenix in the lawsuit by Phoenix-area voter Laurie Aguilera, who also alleged ink from the marker bled through the back side of her ballot and that poll workers refused her request for a new ballot.

4:30 p.m. Thursday

Biden says he feels “very good” about the outcome of the presidential election and is telling his supporters to “stay calm” as votes continue to be counted.

Biden delivered brief remarks Thursday at a theater in downtown Wilmington, Delaware. He says, “It is the will of the voters — no one, not anyone else — who chooses the president of the United States of America.”

Trump’s campaign has pursued legal efforts to halt the vote counting in some states and is seeking a recount in Wisconsin.

Biden says that “the process is working” and “we’ll know very soon” the outcome of the election. Biden and his top campaign officials have expressed confidence about the vote but have been careful to emphasize the need for every ballot to be counted.

Biden’s running mate, California Sen. Kamala Harris, stood next to him as he spoke.

The Associated Press has not called the presidential race yet because neither Biden nor Trump has secured the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory. Several key states remain too early to call — Pennsylvania, Georgia, North Carolina and Nevada.

3:35 p.m. Thursday

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has ordered the U.S. Postal Service to perform twice daily sweeps of processing centers in states with extended ballot receipt deadlines to check for mail-in votes and to expedite them for delivery.

Thursday’s order will remain in place until the end of states’ windows for accepting ballots.

According to court records, a similar order by the same judge earlier this week found just 13 ballots in a search of 27 processing hubs in several battleground areas.

Elections officials in key battleground states are continuing presidential vote counting. Democrat Joe Biden is urging patience, while President Donald Trump is pursing his legal options.

Several key states are too early to call — Pennsylvania, Georgia, North Carolina and Nevada.

2:15 p.m. Thursday

The Arizona Democratic Party has asked a court to let it participate in a lawsuit that alleges vote tabulation equipment in metro Phoenix was unable to record a voter’s ballot because she completed it with a county-issued Sharpie pen.

A judge is holding a hearing Thursday in Phoenix in the lawsuit by voter Laurie Aguilera, who also alleged that ink from the marker bled through the back side of her ballot and that poll workers refused her request for a new ballot.

Aguilera is seeking a court order for all Maricopa County voters whose ballots were rejected as a result of using a Sharpie to be given a chance to fix their ballots. She also is asking for such voters to be able to be present while election officials count their ballots.

The Democrats say the lawsuit is based on the unconfirmed account of one voter and her request to monitor ballot processing could throw the processing of ballots in Arizona’s largest county in disarray.

In a court filing, the party says Democratic voters could be disenfranchised if Aguilera and others were able to challenge a voter’s intent in making ballot choices without knowing the applicable standards.

Arizona election officials have said voting with a Sharpie would have no impact on the votes being recorded by a tabulation machine.

1:55 p.m. Thursday

As the nation awaits results from Nevada, Clark County Registrar Joe Gloria says it could take until Saturday or Sunday before the state’s largest county finishes tallying mail-in ballots that have been returned.

Gloria said Thursday at a press conference: “Our goal here in Clark County is not to count fast. We want to make sure that we’re being accurate.”

Gloria says Clark County has at least 63,262 ballots left to count, including 34,743 returned in drop boxes on Election Day and 4,208 returned via the U.S. Postal Service. But as mail-in ballots postmarked by Election Day continue to trickle in, Gloria said he had no way of knowing the total number of outstanding ballots.

He says, “That’s a number that I can’t give you. I can’t predict to you what’s going to come through the U.S. mail.”

Gloria says the fact that Nevada’s six electoral votes could push Democrat Joe Biden beyond the 270 electoral vote threshold needed to win the presidency reaffirmed the need to not rush the count.

He said the last day to count ballots is Nov. 12.

1:30 p.m. Thursday

A Michigan judge has dismissed a lawsuit by President Donald Trump’s campaign in a dispute over whether Republican challengers had access to the handling of absentee ballots.

Judge Cynthia Stephens noted that the lawsuit was filed late Wednesday afternoon, just hours before the last ballots were counted. She also said the defendant, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, was the wrong person to sue because she doesn’t control the logistics of local ballot counting, even if she is the state’s chief election officer.

The Associated Press called the Michigan presidential election for Democrat Joe Biden on Wednesday evening. Trump won the state in 2016.

The lawsuit claimed Benson, a Democrat, was allowing absentee ballots to be counted without teams of bipartisan observers as well as challengers. She was accused of undermining the “constitutional right of all Michigan voters … to participate in fair and lawful elections.”

Benson, through state attorneys, denied the allegations. Much of the dispute centered on the TCF Center in Detroit where pro-Trump protesters gathered while absentee ballots were being counted.

12:10 p.m. Thursday

Nevada officials have released additional result information on the state website. Biden has an approximately 12,000 vote lead on Trump. It is unclear how much of the vote still needs to be counted.

11:45 a.m. Thursday

A judge in Georgia has dismissed a lawsuit by the state Republican Party and President Donald Trump’s campaign that asked him to ensure a coastal county was following state laws on processing absentee ballots.

Chatham County Superior Court Judge James Bass did not provide an explanation for his decision Thursday at the close of a roughly one-hour hearing. The county includes the heavily Democratic city of Savannah.

The suit had raised concerns about 53 absentee ballots that poll observers said were not part of an original batch of ballots. County elections officials testified that all 53 ballots had been received on time.

11:40 a.m. Thursday

Members of the Trump campaign spoke in Nevada late this morning announcing they were filing a federal lawsuit in the state. They said they are filing this lawsuit to “protect legal voters,” claiming thousands of votes have been counted from people who do not live in Clark County, home to Las Vegas.

There are no reports from Nevada election officials of voting irregularities or votes being counted from people who don’t live in the state. State officials plan to give an election update shortly.

10:55 a.m. Thursday

Arizona state officials say there are 375,000 ballots still to be counted in the Western battleground.

The AP says it is monitoring that vote count as it comes in. The AP has called the presidential race in Arizona for Democrat Joe Biden, but several media outlets have said it’s still too close to call.

AP executive editor Sally Buzbee says: “The Associated Press continues to watch and analyze vote count results from Arizona. We will follow the facts in all cases.”

Biden holds a 2.35 percentage point lead over Trump in Arizona, an advantage of about 68,000 votes.

4 a.m. Thursday

There are still a handful of states that have not released their final results. They are Nevada, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Alaska, Georgia and Arizona. The Associated Press has called Arizona for Biden, though most other news outlets have not.

Check back here as we report on major updates. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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