Bookmark this article for the latest coronavirus news and numbers across Kentuckiana and the country. NumbersKentucky – Monday cases – 1,988| Total cases – 244,297 | Monday deaths – 15 | Total deaths – 2412Indiana – Monday cases – 3,978 | Total cases – 468,219 | Monday deaths – 31 | Total deaths – 7,101(Scroll down for historical data, county breakdowns)Latest headlines out of Kentucky and IndianaTighter restrictions on Kentucky businesses now liftedIndiana hospitals will have to suspend all non-emergency procedures’Indiana is on fire’: Governor says all counties now red in this measure of COVID-19 spreadKentucky could see five separate shipments of COVID-19 vaccines before first weeks of new yearThese Louisville hospitals will be among the first 11 to get COVID-19 vaccines‘The very worst day’: Kentucky sets several grim new coronavirus records All Kentucky schools, public and private, ordered to move online Current COVID-19 restrictionsKentuckyMask mandate renewed on Dec. 3 for 30 days.All public and private schools closed. Elementary can resume Dec. 7 if county is out of the red zone. Middle and high schools can’t resume before Jan. 4.These restrictions end at 11:59 p.m. on Dec. 13:Indoor dining closed (back to 50% when current order ends)Social gatherings limited to no more than 2 households, 8 people (this will be a recommendation when order ends)33% occupancy at gyms, fitness centersRetail 50% occupancyIndoor events can’t exceed 25 people per room (back to 50% when order ends)50% occupancy at salons, parlors, etc.Restaurant/bar curfew is 11 p.m.IndianaMask mandate in effect.No non-emergent surgeries until Jan. 3.Restrictions on gatherings decided by a county’s “color.” The limits are 25 people for counties in red, 50 people for counties in orange, 100 people for yellow counties and 250 people for blue counties.Check out Indiana’s positivity map below: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What’s new across the country: Week of Dec. 7, 2020More than 14.7 million Americans have been infected and at least 282,000 have died, according to Johns Hopkins University.After the first cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in the United States on Jan. 20, it took almost 100 days to reach 1 million infections. Now, the country has added more than 1 million cases to its grim total in just five days. From Tuesday to Saturday, 1,000,882 new coronavirus cases were reported in the U.S., according to data from Johns Hopkins University.A Vermont hospital fell prey to a cyberattack, becoming one of the most recent and visible examples of a wave of digital assaults taking U.S. health care providers hostage as COVID-19 cases surge nationwide.Inside the ICU: Frontline workers from a Wisconsin hospital describe the devastating conditions due to COVID-19. COVID-19 cases and deaths in Kentucky and IndianaMobile users, click here to see the interactive maps and charts that show coronavirus stats for your area.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 do Kentucky and Indiana compare to other states?Mobile users, click here to see the interactive map below for a look at coronavirus in your area.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What are the symptoms of COVID-19/coronavirus?Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:Fever or chillsCoughShortness of breath or difficulty breathingFatigueMuscle or body achesHeadacheNew loss of taste or smellSore throatCongestion or runny noseNausea or vomitingDiarrheaThis list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as they learn more about the virus.Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in Kentucky/Indiana?The CDC recommends that you should consider taking a COVID-19 test if you:have symptoms of COVID-19.have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, local/external icon or state ​health department.Testing in Kentucky: To see a map of testing locations, click here. For free drive-thru locations, click here. Kentucky’s COVID-19 hotline is a service operated by the healthcare professionals at the KY Poison Control Center who can provide advice and answer questions. The number is 1(800) 722-5725.Testing in Louisville: Currently all Louisville hospitals and health systems are offering testing for their patients. There are also several sites for the general public. Find info on them here.Testing in Indiana: If you develop symptoms or think you’ve been exposed to COVID-19, the Indiana State Department of Health recommends calling your health care provider for medical advice. If you have a medical appointment, call your doctor’s office or emergency department, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients. Click here for a list of Indiana’s testing sites throughout the state. Questions about COVID-19 may be directed to the ISDH COVID-19 Call Center at the toll-free number 877-826-0011 (available 24/7).Emergency care for COVID-19 symptomsThe CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:Trouble breathingPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusionInability to wake or stay awakeBluish lips or faceThis list is not all possible symptoms. Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.Who is most at risk for coronavirus?Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.Flu or COVID-19. What’s the difference between them?Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. That’s when testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19. The CDC says it seems COVID-19 spreads more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms of COVID-19 and people can be contagious for a longer period of time than the flu.Another difference is there is a vaccine to protect against the flu. There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus.

Bookmark this article for the latest coronavirus news and numbers across Kentuckiana and the country.

Numbers

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Kentucky – Monday cases – 1,988| Total cases – 244,297 | Monday deaths – 15 | Total deaths – 2412
Indiana – Monday cases – 3,978 | Total cases – 468,219 | Monday deaths – 31 | Total deaths – 7,101

(Scroll down for historical data, county breakdowns)

Latest headlines out of Kentucky and Indiana

Current COVID-19 restrictions

Kentucky

Mask mandate renewed on Dec. 3 for 30 days.

All public and private schools closed. Elementary can resume Dec. 7 if county is out of the red zone. Middle and high schools can’t resume before Jan. 4.

These restrictions end at 11:59 p.m. on Dec. 13:

  • Indoor dining closed (back to 50% when current order ends)
  • Social gatherings limited to no more than 2 households, 8 people (this will be a recommendation when order ends)
  • 33% occupancy at gyms, fitness centers
  • Retail 50% occupancy
  • Indoor events can’t exceed 25 people per room (back to 50% when order ends)
  • 50% occupancy at salons, parlors, etc.

Restaurant/bar curfew is 11 p.m.

Indiana

Mask mandate in effect.

No non-emergent surgeries until Jan. 3.

Restrictions on gatherings decided by a county’s “color.” The limits are 25 people for counties in red, 50 people for counties in orange, 100 people for yellow counties and 250 people for blue counties.

Check out Indiana’s positivity map below:

What’s new across the country: Week of Dec. 7, 2020

More than 14.7 million Americans have been infected and at least 282,000 have died, according to Johns Hopkins University.

After the first cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in the United States on Jan. 20, it took almost 100 days to reach 1 million infections. Now, the country has added more than 1 million cases to its grim total in just five days. From Tuesday to Saturday, 1,000,882 new coronavirus cases were reported in the U.S., according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

A Vermont hospital fell prey to a cyberattack, becoming one of the most recent and visible examples of a wave of digital assaults taking U.S. health care providers hostage as COVID-19 cases surge nationwide.

Inside the ICU: Frontline workers from a Wisconsin hospital describe the devastating conditions due to COVID-19.


COVID-19 cases and deaths in Kentucky and Indiana

Mobile users, click here to see the interactive maps and charts that show coronavirus stats for your area.


How do Kentucky and Indiana compare to other states?

Mobile users, click here to see the interactive map below for a look at coronavirus in your area.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19/coronavirus?

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as they learn more about the virus.

Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in Kentucky/Indiana?

The CDC recommends that you should consider taking a COVID-19 test if you:

  • have symptoms of COVID-19.
  • have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.
  • have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, local/external icon or state ​health department.

Testing in Kentucky: To see a map of testing locations, click here. For free drive-thru locations, click here. Kentucky’s COVID-19 hotline is a service operated by the healthcare professionals at the KY Poison Control Center who can provide advice and answer questions. The number is 1(800) 722-5725.

Testing in Louisville: Currently all Louisville hospitals and health systems are offering testing for their patients. There are also several sites for the general public. Find info on them here.

Testing in Indiana: If you develop symptoms or think you’ve been exposed to COVID-19, the Indiana State Department of Health recommends calling your health care provider for medical advice. If you have a medical appointment, call your doctor’s office or emergency department, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients. Click here for a list of Indiana’s testing sites throughout the state. Questions about COVID-19 may be directed to the ISDH COVID-19 Call Center at the toll-free number 877-826-0011 (available 24/7).

Emergency care for COVID-19 symptoms

The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

This list is not all possible symptoms. Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Who is most at risk for coronavirus?

Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.

Flu or COVID-19. What’s the difference between them?

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. That’s when testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.

There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19. The CDC says it seems COVID-19 spreads more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms of COVID-19 and people can be contagious for a longer period of time than the flu.

Another difference is there is a vaccine to protect against the flu. There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus.

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