Gov. Andy Beshear is criticizing the early stages of impeachment proceedings against him because he says those behind the efforts are tied to recent threatening behavior.The governor has been taking questions about the impeachment proceedings since a petition triggered the creation of a committee. Under Kentucky law, the petition must be referred to the committee once it is formally filed.While experts — and even lawmakers on both sides — agree the impeachment proceedings are a long shot, Beshear has been trying to cast doubt on the process.In the video player below: Beshear talks about background of petitionersDuring his COVID-19 briefing Tuesday, the governor said the people behind the petition — four Kentuckians mostly upset with his handling of the pandemic — have been engaging in threatening behavior that he said is similar to those behind last week’s riot at the U.S. Capitol.”I cannot believe that a part of our state government would — and shouldn’t — support those that have engaged in activities of intimidation and hate,” Beshear said.The governor said two of the petitioners — Jacob Clark of Grayson County and Tony Wheatley of Mercer County — have been critical of Beshear in the past, going as far as making violent posts on social media and trying to scare him and his family.Beshear said Clark was found to have posted messages on social media that included a video where he’s seen with a gun next to him. Another post suggests hanging politicians.Wheatley, Beshear said, is behind a rally during Memorial Day weekend at the Kentucky Capitol that saw attendees hang an effigy of the governor from a tree.The governor said Wheatley also put together a rally in which participants stormed past barricades in front of the governor’s mansion and made their way to windows near where Beshear’s children played.Beshear said the people who signed the petition “have tried to create terror for me and my family.””When that hasn’t worked, I guess they’re trying something new,” Beshear said.The governor said he hopes lawmakers in Kentucky will not “lift these folks up.””It’s dangerous, it’s fanning the flames of their hate and their anger,” he said.Sam Marcosson, a constitutional law professor at UofL told WLKY that the petitions rarely ever make it farther than that first step because state law does not require any further action, he said.”I think you should be watching for whether the General Assembly — and the committee to which it’s assigned — schedule hearings because public hearings allow for this to get oxygen,” Marcosson said.The committee has yet to schedule hearings.

Gov. Andy Beshear is criticizing the early stages of impeachment proceedings against him because he says those behind the efforts are tied to recent threatening behavior.

The governor has been taking questions about the impeachment proceedings since a petition triggered the creation of a committee. Under Kentucky law, the petition must be referred to the committee once it is formally filed.

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While experts — and even lawmakers on both sides — agree the impeachment proceedings are a long shot, Beshear has been trying to cast doubt on the process.

During his COVID-19 briefing Tuesday, the governor said the people behind the petition — four Kentuckians mostly upset with his handling of the pandemic — have been engaging in threatening behavior that he said is similar to those behind last week’s riot at the U.S. Capitol.

“I cannot believe that a part of our state government would — and shouldn’t — support those that have engaged in activities of intimidation and hate,” Beshear said.

The governor said two of the petitioners — Jacob Clark of Grayson County and Tony Wheatley of Mercer County — have been critical of Beshear in the past, going as far as making violent posts on social media and trying to scare him and his family.

Beshear said Clark was found to have posted messages on social media that included a video where he’s seen with a gun next to him. Another post suggests hanging politicians.

Wheatley, Beshear said, is behind a rally during Memorial Day weekend at the Kentucky Capitol that saw attendees hang an effigy of the governor from a tree.

The governor said Wheatley also put together a rally in which participants stormed past barricades in front of the governor’s mansion and made their way to windows near where Beshear’s children played.

Beshear said the people who signed the petition “have tried to create terror for me and my family.”

“When that hasn’t worked, I guess they’re trying something new,” Beshear said.

The governor said he hopes lawmakers in Kentucky will not “lift these folks up.”

“It’s dangerous, it’s fanning the flames of their hate and their anger,” he said.

Sam Marcosson, a constitutional law professor at UofL told WLKY that the petitions rarely ever make it farther than that first step because state law does not require any further action, he said.

“I think you should be watching for whether the General Assembly — and the committee to which it’s assigned — schedule hearings because public hearings allow for this to get oxygen,” Marcosson said.

The committee has yet to schedule hearings.

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