The Kentucky State Fair wrapped up Saturday with the grand finale of the World’s Championship Horse Show. Organizers say 1500 horses competed in this year’s event which is slightly lower than usual. Spectators were limited to those with direct connections to the participants. Even with the reduced capacity, it was worth it for participants like Sena Bowling, who’s been showing horses at the fair with her husband Wes for nearly 30 years.”This is the livelihood for many people. It’s an industry and this is so important for us to have this go on and honestly it shows the world that there’s hope that things can be normal,” Bowling said.All 11 horses the Bowlings brought this year won ribbons, but for many of those involved with the getting the chance to shine on this stage was the biggest prize.”With all the circumstances it really turned out great. It’s the end of the week, last night, the week was successful, uneventful. I feel like I’m privileged to have this today,” competitor Dan Flowers said. David Beck, the president and CEO of Kentucky Venues Which oversees the state fair said overall the measures in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19 went smoothly.”Normally we would have more than 23,000 entries from the bakery to all the different type of contests on the property. We didn’t have that this year. So we were limited in events and limited of numbers within those events to follow the guidelines and compliance,” Beck said. The fair was originally supposed to run through Sunday, but because of the COVID changes there were no more events scheduled. Earlier this week, Beck told state lawmakers the state fair has lost around $11 million this year. He said the state fair typically sees about 600,000 visitors.

The Kentucky State Fair wrapped up Saturday with the grand finale of the World’s Championship Horse Show.

Organizers say 1500 horses competed in this year’s event which is slightly lower than usual.
Spectators were limited to those with direct connections to the participants.

Even with the reduced capacity, it was worth it for participants like Sena Bowling, who’s been showing horses at the fair with her husband Wes for nearly 30 years.

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“This is the livelihood for many people. It’s an industry and this is so important for us to have this go on and honestly it shows the world that there’s hope that things can be normal,” Bowling said.

All 11 horses the Bowlings brought this year won ribbons, but for many of those involved with the getting the chance to shine on this stage was the biggest prize.

“With all the circumstances it really turned out great. It’s the end of the week, last night, the week was successful, uneventful. I feel like I’m privileged to have this today,” competitor Dan Flowers said.

David Beck, the president and CEO of Kentucky Venues Which oversees the state fair said overall the measures in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19 went smoothly.

“Normally we would have more than 23,000 entries from the bakery to all the different type of contests on the property. We didn’t have that this year. So we were limited in events and limited of numbers within those events to follow the guidelines and compliance,” Beck said.

The fair was originally supposed to run through Sunday, but because of the COVID changes there were no more events scheduled.

Earlier this week, Beck told state lawmakers the state fair has lost around $11 million this year. He said the state fair typically sees about 600,000 visitors.

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