Kentucky senior living centers begin receiving first doses of COVID-19 vaccines

good afternoon, everyone. Today we celebrate another great and hopeful day in our battle against Cove in 19. It was just one week ago that we received our first shipments of vaccines here in the Commonwealth. It was just six days ago that we started vaccinating our frontline healthcare workers. Now Walgreens, one of our core corporate partners in protecting Kentucky and South, is beginning to administer the lifesaving Pfizer bio in tech vaccine toe. What is by far the most vulnerable population that cove it praise upon here in the Commonwealth, our residents in long term care and the hard working staff that works to protect them. The immediate goal is helping these facilities and Kentucky by reducing Cove in 19 deaths. Over two thirds of deaths here in Kentucky due to the coronavirus come from long term care facilities. So these vaccinations have the rial potential to deal the coronavirus a significant blow and tow lessen the loss that we have all lived through here in the Commonwealth, and to do so in just a couple of months. This action, prioritizing our long term care residents and the staff will save lives beginning today our long term care residents also require the most care when they have to go to the hospital, so vaccinating them early will also increase our health care capacity so that others who show up to the hospital, whether it’s with co vid or having a heart attack or even a stroke can get the care they need. And we have the capacity in terms of beds and medical professionals to take care of them every week. We do not vaccinate our long term care residents. We lose them. But with vaccines, we can provide so much better protection to these individuals. And we’ve taken an aggressive steps since March the sixth, when our first case of coronavirus was reported, toe fight back against this virus to not surrender and accept the casualties, but to push back to protect our Kentucky neighbors and friends and family. This is a great day for long term care residents, and it is yet another day that we march towards victory in our battle against Cove in 19. We only have to look at one facility Thompson Hood, veteran center and well, more to see the devastation that this virus can cause in a long term care facility the dedicated staff kept cove it out for months upon months. Not one case. But once this evil virus overwhelmed the defenses and entered the facility, it wreaked havoc on the residents, our heroes who had sacrificed so much for their country After keeping cove it out for most of the year, we’ve now lost 34 residents in this one facility in the last two months. It is heartbreaking, and it shows how ruthless this virus is and why it’s so important that these vaccinations occur early in long term care, and tomorrow, thankfully, vaccinations will begin at that facility and we will have more information to share about them. Protecting our seniors has been a priority since the beginning of this pandemic. We limited visitations to facilities, which was necessary, with more than 13,000 long term care residents and 9500 staff testing positive at more than 400 facilities. Since the beginning of this pandemic in March, there’ve been more than 1600 deaths in our long term care facilities. We have to do all we can to protect our most vulnerable. Along with monitoring those who entered the facilities, we’ve taken decisive action to help long term care facilities themselves. We partnered with Norton Healthcare to establish a 24 7 call center access for long term care facilities. Connecting with Resource is at the Kentucky Department for Public Health. Trade Notes in Louisville was the first to rely on this assistance, and the state helped to relocate residents as the cove in numbers spiked in that facility. As we partnered with local communities and health care leaders to fight this virus, we distributed $1.6 billion in federal coronavirus aid relief and Economic Security Act funding, among others. This funding provided more than a billion dollars to state, city and county governments and local health departments for first responders. PPE sanitizing testing tele work and $114 million for long term care facilities, nurse strike teams and testing the Kentucky Department for Public Health mobilized strike teams toe hard hit facilities in the Kentucky National Guard also mobilized 10 non clinical support teams to support the state’s response. We issued guidance to protect residents, including limiting visitors, which I know it’s hard. We recommended residents leave a facility only when medically necessary and for needs it cannot be met on site or through telehealth. We worked with our Cabinet for health and family Services to form a cross functional advisory task force represented by so many different professionals in this field, several of whom are nationally known to provide guidance to our long term care facilities. We also adopted an aggressive testing approach. Long term care Facilities air following guidance issued by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which advises the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Kentucky’s initial lot allotment of the Pfizer vaccine. More than 25,000 doses are going toe Walgreens and CVS, which have a federal contract to ultimately help us vaccinate all of our long term care residents and staff. The booster doses for each of the doses given here in the initial amounts will follow in about three weeks. My administration’s goal and the goal of Walgreens and CVS is to have all our residents in long term care and the staff vaccinated. By the beginning of March, when Mawr, Kentucky and Zehr vaccinated, we can visit our loved ones more often. We’re already for those visits that we know we miss so much and have an impact on the mental and emotional health of both those inside the facilities and those who are visiting and missing their loved ones. The facilities these vaccines are game changers. We are going to defeat Cove in 19, but unfortunately, it doesn’t mean the sacrifices we’ve had to make in today or that we can let our guard down. Distributing these vaccines is going to take time and whether it’s it, by the end of spring or the end of summer that everybody who wants a vaccine can get a vaccine. We know we’ve got to continue to wear masks and social distance, take extra care with those over 65 or with heart, lung or kidney disease that we could still lose. So Maney Kentucky ins between now and the full deployment of the vaccination and every one of those losses would be avoidable. Please limit your gatherings, limit travel even in and around Christmas. I want to thank our public and private partners who are doing so much toe limit the spread and protect the most vulnerable. Thanks to our partners at UPS, who are making sure those precious packages are getting to our health care facilities. Thank you to our health care workers who are working around the clock fighting this virus saving lives. And right now they’re getting a little shot of hope in the form of this vaccine. These heroes have gone into hospitals and long term care facilities day after day, exposing themselves to this virus to protect others. Now, to show Thio show a little light at the end of the tunnel, Signature Healthcare at Summerfield Rehab and Wellness Center has sent some photos and pictures of vaccinations at two of our Kentucky facilities. The first one is off. This is Jo Jo Shore of Summerfield in Louisville. He is believed to be the first to receive the vaccine today. We gotta like this Santa hat. The next is Dr Leon Butler, Sunrise Manor medical director in Ha Jin Ville. The next is Stephen Dirk Patrick, resident at Jefferson Manner in Louisville. We got the cats and the cards out today, and the next is Janet Shoaf, resident at Jefferson Manner in Louisville. No, we also have photos from CBS at Homestead Post Acute Care in Lexington. The first pick is Mary Lane. These are incredible. I mean, since March, the sixth ease air the days we’ve been waiting for. These pictures are incredible. These are the residents of people that we’ve been worried so much about during this pandemic. And look at this talk about Hope. Second pick is Mary Sykes. If the third pick is Susan Arnold there, Susan, right next to Christmas Tree vaccines are a Christmas miracle that is a perfect picture in the fourth picture is a net dense. She has been at Homestead Post acute over 40 years and has worked as a C N A Restorative Aid and, most recently, activities directors. Thank you to her. We’re fighting so hard every day over these past nine plus months to keep residents safe, and there’s a long way to go. But I hope this helps lift her spirits and those within the facility to know that victory it’s coming. We still gotta work hard, but it’s coming. This is the beginning of the end for this virus, and these vaccines will save lives, especially in long term care. I now want to hand this over to Walgreens regional health care director Jean Hoover. Thank you to jeans and a Walgreens and CVS. All of us working together are going to save so many lives as we defeat the coronavirus gene. Thank you. Governor Beshear were honored and excited to be a part of the the immunization effort in supporting you in the C. D. C across the Commonwealth. Uh, it’s an exciting time, As you mentioned earlier, the beginning of the end of the co vid 19 pandemic. Uh, this morning at 5. 59 as you mentioned, we provided our first cove in 19 immunization and our teams were swelling with pride with regards to the opportunity toe do that outreach and and really make a difference in the lives off the individuals across the Commonwealth, specifically those in long term care facilities on the staff members that worked there as well. All sites are not new to the Walgreen Company. Over the last five years, we’ve provided 150,000 immunization off right off sites nationwide. And over the last 10 years we’ve immunized over 70. We provided over 70 million immunization. So again very, very excited by the capability of our team and the ability to protect the communities we serve is all pharmacists are in the coming months, will provide outreached over 35,000 long term care facilities nationwide and hopefully provide over three million covert 19 immunizations, the individuals that are residents there and the staff. I do want to reiterate that in our stores today, we do not have Cove in 19 vaccinations for the general population is governed by sheer mentioned earlier that will be coming in the future months, and we’ll be very, very excited to begin that process of immunizing individuals in the communities we serve nationwide. So in closing, I do want to thank government Bashir for his partnership, our excitement around partnering with the C. D. C. And look forward to continuing the beginning of the end, as you mentioned of the Cove in 19 Pandemic for governor. Back to you. Thank you, Gene on and for Walmart, Walgreens and CVS Thank you so much. Your experience, and this is invaluable. Your ability to handle the Pfizer vaccine and the extra, uh, steps and process you have to go through with the deep refrigeration. You’ve been a great benefit to the Commonwealth. What most people don’t know is originally there was planning and even contracting with the federal government for a two week ramp up time. They cut that in half in today, we’re seeing those vaccinations occurring earlier than we had originally anticipated. So again, thio, both of them, they are both. Both are partners. Walgreens here with us today and CVS, you’re doing a great job. We want to do this as fast as we can, but we wanna make sure that we get to every single one of these facilities, and I know we will. Next is the president and CEO of leading age Kentucky, Timothy Vino. Thank you, Governor. Indeed, it is a great day in the Commonwealth or I should say, another great day. After nine grueling months, I cannot think of a better Christmas gift for a residence, staff and families of Kentucky’s long term care facilities in the delivery of the cov it vaccine. As you said, Governor, the beginning of the end is in sight, and we’re thrilled that the first vaccines will begin today, for our residents in our incredibly hard working staff, also would be remitted to not say how much we appreciate $114 million in Cares act investment. It made a huge difference in reducing illness, misery and deaths in our Kentucky long term care facilities. This critical financial support, as you said, launched the robust state supported Cove in 19 testing program, which I believe to be one of the more robust, uh, state sponsored programs in the country. It also, as you said, established the cove in 19 clinical support hotline maintained by Norton Healthcare. It allowed for the deployment of clinical support teams and mobilization of the National Guard. All of these have been a big help. We’re grateful to this for this ongoing support. Grateful to you, governor grateful to Cabinet for Health and Family Services Secretary Kerry Freelander for their collaboration and the tireless war of the entire team at C H f s. We believe that those services protected our residents in our staff and their families. Thank you very much. Thank you to, uh, Timothy Vino. We know how hard you’ve worked and how hard it has been toe watch the the devastation of this virus. But I know today we all feel such renewed hope and such renewed optimism and the knowledge that we’re gonna win. We just gotta protect each other as we move through the months that it takes to deploy this vaccine. Next. The executive director of the Episcopal Church Home in Louisville, Beverly Edwards. It’s but thank you, governor. First year during the first eight months of the pandemic, none of our residents at Episcopal Church Home tested positive for the coronavirus. However, as the virus spread more rapidly throughout the broader community over the past month, I have witnessed the impact that this horrible virus has had on our residents in our staff, and it is simply heartbreak. For this reason, I am grateful that our residents, residents and staff will be among the first individuals within our community to be inoculated for the Corona virus. Personally, I am excited to receive the vaccination, and I encourage everyone to take it to help our elders. Everyone has individuals within their lives that need the world to them. On Wednesday, I will take the vaccination for those that mean toe the world to me, my residents, my staff, family in France. Thank you again, Governor. For all you’re doing to protect our residents. We sincerely appreciate your efforts. That’s you, Governor. Yeah. Thank you, Beverly, for working hard every single day to protect your residents and their families. Finally, we’ve got secretary for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services. He’s a guy that has been working with me side by side in our battle against this every single day. And who, around this time of year can also serve as our Santa Claus lookalike Secretary, Eric Freelander. E think I should say ho ho ho to that Governor. Um Thank you, Governor. Thank you, Gene. Thank you, Tim. Thank you, Beverly. Uh, thank you. Team Kentucky and team C H F s. This is a great day. This is a great day, not on Lee for Kentucky. But as we have seen, this is a great day in the world and in the nation as this virus really has attacked those people, those health care workers in long term care. And as the governor said, What we our goal has been and what it has always been is to save lives. So as I said, this has been a great day for the workers who have, in the face of uncertainty, continued to act heroically in our long term care facilities. Thank you. You have made a tremendous difference. And I’m so glad. But today we’re going to be able, Thio say thank you back with the vaccine. This is also a great day for our residents, who we can now begin to protect against this disease. It’s also a great day for our families because we can begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel. This is the beginning of the end of our fight against Cove in and as the governor said, getting the vaccine this quickly is nothing short of a scientific miracle. We didn’t know about this disease, maybe even a year ago and a have a vaccine. Now that we are already deploying is tremendous news for all of us. However, science and a scientific miracle we need to continue to be led by silent science. We have to follow science and keep ourselves socially distance. We still have to wash our hands. We still have to wear a mask. We still have to limit our travel in our our get togethers and our gatherings. We can’t quit the race just because we can see the finish line. So this has and continues to be, ah, challenge for our collective will, our patients, our perseverance. We need to continue the race and we must continue to take care of each other. I hope if there’s one thing that we learned from this covert challenge and the challenges that we face together in the long term care facilities, it proves this whatever happens to one of us in our communities, one of us in our state really does happen to us all really does impact us all. So we have to take care of each other, particularly through these times, holidays and celebrations. Christmas. I’ve got a bow back there and, uh, ho ho ho, Governor. Um and it is ho ho ho of happiness. Because we now have something that we can deploy against co vid and win Governor. I turn it back over to you. Well, thank you, Secretary Friedlander, for your leadership through this crisis, from everything from working with long term care facilities to making sure our kids get enough to eat through the pandemic E B T program, you’ve you’ve led with courage, but also with empathy. And we’re better off haven’t had your leadership. All right, we’ll move to questions. We will start with Tom Latex from Kentucky today. Good afternoon, Governor. Um verse. Um, differing amounts off How many doses we’re going to get? Uh, understand. The second batch is going to be less than the first. What? What was the original plan and how do things stand now? Number wise. So we’re still waiting for some clarification from the federal government. What you read is about all that we have seen. So our our first Pfizer shipment waas 0, 30 between 36 38,000 doses, I believe, and we have received all that by receiving it. We either pushed it to CVS and Walgreens, and it goes to them for their program. Or it arrived at those 11 initial facilities that have that have then begun vaccinating frontline healthcare workers. The shipments that are being received, actually today and some even before today of Moderna are the full amount that we had announced there. And that’s in the 70 thousands. And and we’ll, uh, talk about the number of locations for that tonight. What? What I believe Tom’s referring to is the second shipment of Pfizer, which is supposed to come this week, which is less, um than than what we were originally told by the federal government It’s hard to know right now the reasons why it appears that there is some discrepancy with, um understanding FDA rules about when you can ship it out or not. What I know is we’re only, um, getting 20. Oh, I want to say it was about 26,000 doses in the second round of Pfizer when we believed it was gonna be significantly more. But we have already made changes in in numbers and how we allocate out the Pfizer and the Madonna to keep our long term care program on track. We’re gonna make sure that that program stays on track to get everybody vaccinated by the end of February 1st of March. Karen’s are from W U K Y. Hello, Governor. Thank you. I know it’s early on, but what seems to be the percentage of those living and working in long term care seem to be receptive to taking the vaccine. And what challenges do you see? Like I had to reach that mark O, thank you. Well, uh, Karen, we don’t have the statistics back yet because it’s it’s just today that we’ve started. I could tell you that I believe as of now, or earlier Today we vaccinated about 7319 individuals in Kentucky. Most of those are our hospital workers, it least from initial indications the vast majority of long term care residents want the vaccine. We have not heard of any facilities where a significant portion are saying no to it. And if you look at the mortality rate amongst those in long term care when they contract it, you could understand why, especially even if it’s just a balancing of, should I or should I not take it? By far the weight of that decision for a long term care is that you absolutely should. We’ll see if we’ve got some numbers back. But my understanding is, um, an overwhelming majority of long term care residents and staff wanting the vaccine. Ryan Van Belzer from wf pl Thank you, Governor. I’m curious who? The group that’s next in line to receive the vaccine after long term care and hospital workers. I also want to follow up on Tom’s question. I’m a little confused now about the total number of vaccines that you expect to come to the state over the next month. We can talk about the total number we expect to come over the month for I don’t have all those numbers in front of me. But we expect two shipments of Pfizer and two shipments of Madonna expected to exceed about 150,000 doses. It’s just the the second Pfizer shipment Waas Oh, I want to say about two thirds and I’m estimating of what we initially expected. And we all want to get these vaccines deployed as as soon as possible. And then they first part of the question. Will you repeat, please? Run. Yes. Just who got next priority, right? Go ahead. Okay. Eso the acid group that is part of the C d. C. That’s making these recommendations that for us to look at about who goes after health care workers and long term care just came back with recommendations yesterday and and and their recommendation waas was almost you could go into paths because their next suggestion is just huge. The number of people who would who would fall into it. So we’re reviewing that right now. What I can say is in Kentucky our mortality rates arm or attached to age than in many other states, meaning We’re doing a better job of keeping younger, Kentucky and alive. But if we’re gonna prioritize the vaccine to save lives, certainly we have to be looking at age as we go. You know, I have committed to getting to educators as quickly as we can for purposes of schools being open and and being able to a t least over time allow for mawr and Mawr and Mawr capacity to get back to a more normal educational experience. But we’re reviewing that right now. We were having conversations on it today on DWI Hope by probably early next week, Toe have at least our initial impressions of that next group. Now, we will not be through hospital workers, frontline healthcare workers, because M s is included in what we’re doing right now and long term care until and have additional vaccines for other groups, probably until mid January. And that is our that’s our our hope in our expectation and maybe a little optimistic. But I think that we will hit the Phil Pendleton from W quite Thank you, Governor. How is it determined which long term care facilities are chosen to receive the vaccine, say today or tomorrow? because I spoke with one in Lexington. They’re not gonna have theirs until next week and administer them on Wednesday. So how is it decided? Which ones are selected first, So we provide some input. But that’s ultimately selected by Walgreens and CVS, who have the federal contract for administering these vaccines. That could be determined on a lot of factors. Certainly. Um, what what we provide a lot of input in our are the most acute in other words, the facilities where people oftentimes need the most help and might be the most vulnerable. But here’s the Here’s the thing. It’s gonna take us until the beginning of March Thio to get through all of these facilities. So I think that we will primarily start with ST Nursing homes, and then we will eventually get to assisted living. But is the hard part Phil Andi for everybody else’s is the patients is the Why is this facility getting it today and us? Not until next week. I guarantee you there’s another facility that maybe a week to two weeks behind that, and this is this is gonna be our challenge until we get the vaccine out for everybody who wants it. But I will say for that other facility having a date certain that it’s coming while not today and we wanted to be today I hope is exciting and redoubles everybody’s willingness toe work to keep people safe. Up until that time, Kelly Dean from Wbk 0, 13 news. Hello, Governor. Um, how do you see visitation changing at these long term care facilities? You know, if you have residents that are vaccinated with their family members have to be vaccinated in order to visit. And what do you see? The timeline for doors opening back up looking like So we’re working on that as we speak. Certainly. We gotta get both doses administered before we we loosen restrictions. And and so that is with Pfizer three week period between the first dose and the second, if an entire facility is vaccinated, are hope. And again we’re working through. This is we’ll be able to allow for more visitation. It doesn’t mean that everything all at once, but certainly the facility is better protected. At that point, we will have to continue to look at community. So bread and the level of it for for amounts of visitation But there’s no question that more visitation is coming on day. Once a facility has fully vaccinated, we can start looking at at loosening those requirements for those restrictions. All right, Katie, if I mispronounced your last name, I apologize. Uh, Katie. Katie, Uh, ter sick from 14. News in Evansville, you know, Thank you. It happens. Some people mispronouncing I’m like, I don’t worry about it, but, um, so I know someone kind of already asked this question basically saying, you know, how are these long term care facilities? When will they be informed about when they get the vaccine and kind of who gets prioritized? But it’s far as where we are. We’re here in the Tri State, so we cover Owensboro, Henderson, Madisonville and a slew of the facilities that I have talked to. You kind of have been like, We either have gotten the letter or we haven’t. So is there anything that you could maybe be more specific on as to how these facilities are getting informed as or maybe when ah, place like the Owensboro Centers or the Henderson centers will receive their vaccines. Do we have gene from Walgreen’s Still on? Oh, I think we lost Gene from from from from Walgreens. Let us let us get a response on exactly how they’re reaching out That happens between either Walgreens or CVS and the time that and and the method that they get, uh, contacted may depend on which one, uh, that it ISS and and also the timing definitely depends on the level of care that there providing. So if it’s an assisted living facility, they ought to expect to be, ah, little bit later. But for those in the nursing home setting, they ought to be hearing here in the next couple of days or week. My hope is at most about when their schedule will be Jack Bremer from the Lexington Herald leader. Let’s go to Secretary Freelander, who’s got a little bit more on that last question. Yes, I’ve been in typing, as as we respond. Yeah, CVS and Walgreens or the folks that will reach out. We think most facilities are all facilities will know within the next week or two on as they get vaccinated. Those facilities there are some facilities that have different levels of care all under one roof. They all they all should be vaccinated at at the same time. So, uh, those folks that have people in other levels of care, if they’re in a facility with skilled nursing level, they will also get vaccinated or should also get vaccinated on the same day. There may be some exceptions to that as we move forward. But that that that’s how we’re planning moving forward and and CBS really? And Walgreens, uh, they really work on the criteria. We work with them, but But they’re the ones that are in charge of that distribution. It is in their, uh, barely wait to do that. Check Bremer from the Herald Leader. Are you there, Jack? Yeah. Yes, I was asking, What is the state’s nursing home population? How many folks are we talking about? Let’s go to Secretary Friedlander. In skilled nursing that levels roughly 20,000. We think there are another 5000 or so and assisted living in personal care. Um, that can change over time with new admissions and new discharges, but but that’s roughly the number Jack. Secretary, I think that the sound only came on when you were, um, about a halfway through your answer. Could you could you do it again for us numbers in long term care. Yes, I think you’re in jail. Um, I on your on right now. Oh, excellent. Well, so the sound didn’t come on at first, and then I was here. All right, so about 20,000 inches long term care skilled nursing facility on, then about another 5000 or so for assisted living in personal care. So those were approximate numbers. They change based on admission and discharge. Right. Sarah, lab from the Courier Journal. Thank you, Governor. You were talking in the very beginning about how you know the vaccine. Obviously, we’re looking at some relief on deaths in the state, as they’ve been a huge chunk of our losses in the state. And I’m curious, you know, when might we see those numbers start to decrease? Will it be sooner rather than later? Or are we looking at March after the booster has come through? Thank you. But we believe that the first dose provides at least some level of protection. And so the moment we have somebody, even with their first dose, we have given them a better chance of battling this virus. Uh, if they contracted the challenge. And when do we see changes to the numbers? Are the deaths trail cases by at least several weeks? Eso, if we are, are working fast here over the next couple months, we ought to be able to see it. Oh, maybe maybe a month from now. But the hard part is gonna be comparing what we have versus what we would have had. Um, you know, in other words, the number of deaths we see versus the number of deaths that we would have seen because the virus is so prevalent right now, even though I believe we haven’t least plateau where we are in fighting this virus or number of cases are so high right now. There’s so much infection that even though we’re not seeing that exponential growth, we’re still gonna Seymour deaths every day that we’re having 3000 cases. But today I think today they’re going to vaccinate at least five facilities across the Commonwealth. Today there is somebody who who has received this vaccine, who’s gonna make it through this pandemic that otherwise wouldn’t have. I mean, today is is one of the first days where we know a vaccine is going into a long term care resident that’s going to save their life will never know which person that it waas. But But we know, based on the levels of infection and the loss that we’ve seen, that today is the day that life is being saved. Piper Hudspeth, Blackburn from the Associated Press. Thanks, Governor. Um, I just want to clarify. Do you anticipate having thio make thes vaccinations mandatory specifically in long term care facilities for both workers and residents? And are there any specific plans on the books to assist vaccinations and long term care facilities and more? Andi, I guess the more rural parts of the state is there any sort of plans that are specific to those areas? Okay, eso, CVS and Walgreens, under that federal contract are are reaching out and creating partnerships where needed where they don’t have the coverage across Kentucky. Now they’re mobile, right? So So they’re not having people come to their store, they’re going to the facility. So in places that they don’t have a great presence there there either planning, travel or or partnerships, uh, to get there, the vaccine will not be mandatory, at least not through any order coming out of the governor’s office. But I tell you, we talk a lot about vaccine hesitancy, and it’s something that we need to. We need to make sure that we build confidence in it. But I’m seeing the opposite. I’m getting about a 50 letters a day or or 50 letters a week at the moment. And we’re seeing a pick up right now about different folks wanting to be, um, in in the highest priority, whether that’s a profession or is an essential worker. And I get it. Um, 94 95% effective is a game changer for these vaccines. So some who would have said if it’s 50 or 60% like the flu vaccine, I might not get it now. Want it? Jose Neil Dhoni’s from Aldea in America. Do we have Jose? All right, we’ll come back. Our cross Look. Okay. Jonathan. Greg from Spectrum Governor. Hi. Can you hear me? I can. Governor, could you tell us, uh, up to this date, the 7000 or so vaccinations have gone out. Mostly frontline workers. Now that you’re vaccinating long term care facilities, what’s the specific number five facilities today? What is that number being vaccinated today in the LTs mhm. I don’t have the number of total individuals being vaccinated today. We’ll get that to you. What we What we know is we have 23,475 doses shipped to Kentucky. Overall, 7319 individuals have been vaccinated. 16,156 are waiting to be administered on. That number has changed. Actually, since this was yesterday with Madonna coming in today, we’ll get you the number of total vaccinations we anticipate today. This is really gonna pick up. So we’ve been vaccinating individuals since Tuesday and long term care, but, I mean, I’m sorry we’ve been vaccinated people since last Tuesday in our acute care hospitals. And if not today, by tomorrow every acute care hospital in Kentucky will have vaccines for their frontline workers. So we’ll see that number pick up pretty rapidly. But then we will see, um, the long term care number pick up very, very quickly as we assualt greens and CBS moves throughout the state. Denny Kemper from W L K Y. Hi, Governor, can you speak to how the data sharing is happening between um, CVS and Walgreens as they started vaccinating people. How they’re reporting those numbers back to the state and how you guys are tracking those. Basically, how are you all keeping an eye on how Maney vaccines are being administered and who they’re going? Thio. It’s a good question. Let’s let’s get Secretary Friedlander, who’s working with. So the way CVS and Walgreens report to us is through our health information exchange. They were able to use that. We’ve signed up all the laboratories. That’s how we’re getting information from a lot of our providers. That’s how it’s coming back into us. It’s through that portal, all right? And do we have either Jose from Aldea or Al Cross? I’m here. Oh, thank you. Go ahead. Okay. About essential workers, for example. Those who working meat factories on farms on all the food industry. Many of those are immigrants. Is there going to be any priority on these workers when it comes to the mass vaccination eso Right now, um, the it’s called the ace it group with the C. D. C. Have just voted yesterday on their recommendations on what comes after this first batch. They have a very large group called Essential Workers. And within, actually, they have two essential worker groups. Their recommendations are, ah, large set that includes the professions, um, and the occupations that you’re talking about and a lot of others as well as Americans over 75. So they really they recommended two different paths at the same time. And I believe there next suggestion is gonna be that states should look at some some different numbers, like mortality or or or exposure to make those decisions were still reviewing that information. Right now, there’s no question, especially in the meat packing and processing facilities that we have seen especially early in the virus, a significant amount of spread. Andi, that is that is a place in an area along with the others that you mentioned where we got to make sure that the vaccine can go to those individuals because the best place, certainly for for for the different areas you mentioned to get vaccinated is at the place of employment. And that’s something we’re working to build as we go. I mean, right now we’ve got a trickle of vaccine. Ah, lot of demand and we’re building up the method of being able to provide it. So, for instance, right now enrolled in the program with the federal government that you have to be enrolled in to provide the vaccine. We have 102 hospitals. 119 local health departments. AH 32 pharmacies. These air facility. So a local health department can have multiple facilities. Four regional health centers, 11 F Q H C for a total of 268 facilities that could provide this. We’re gonna need mawr, especially when we’re looking at mass vaccinations at different sites and on site vaccinations. But we’re building this airplane while we’re flying it, and there is no way that it’s gonna go perfectly, um given, given so much uncertainty about which vaccines will be approved, when and how much will have. But I promise we’ll do our very best to be transparent and also ensure that we are reaching every population out there. The, uh, the push to build confidence is going to include specific outreach, um, to Spanish speaking communities, Azaz well as other underserved communities that that may have more hesitancy about vaccines. Alright, finally, Do we have our cross? I’m here, Governor There you go. Last question to you. L okay. Merry Christmas to, um, you said last week that, uh, you wanted the first responders incapable of educators to come next. And now that the CDC has added this age category and you’ve actually mentioned the age mortality problem that we have Do you expect that in this next round you will be adding people over 75 a t least some degree Thio that next group? Yeah, we’re we’re absolutely considering that right now, because you’re right. When we look at at mortality statistics 60 it’s now closer to 70% of our deaths or individuals in long term care on. Then when you go to that next biggest chunk, it’s adults. Well, really 60 and up. But but the mortality rate 75 up means that those who contracted at that age, I mean face, um, face something really deadly for them. So we are actively considering that right now, we just got this information yesterday from it, but it makes a very compelling argument that getting our older Kentucky and vaccinated as quickly as possible is critically important. All right, thank you. Everybody will have our regular update at four today. But listen, this is an incredible day in Kentucky. We have all lived through very difficult 9 to 10 months. This virus has preyed on people, especially in long term care. And today we fight back. We know there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. We know that we can protect so many of those in long term care that otherwise we might lose. Today is a great day in this battle. We just know that there’s a lot more of the battle to come. Eso We’re gonna get through this, We’re gonna get through it together. Thank you, everybody. And thank you to CVS, Walgreens, all of our long term care residents and workers that are working so hard. Uh, today is another shot of hope. Thanks.

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Kentucky senior living centers begin receiving first doses of COVID-19 vaccines

The first seniors in Kentucky have begun receiving COVID-19 vaccines.The vaccines, from Pfizer, were administered Monday morning at Atria Springdale in Louisville. The senior living community is part of the larger Atria Senior Living network across the country.Distribution of the vaccine comes after the second COVID-19 vaccine, from Moderna, was approved by the FDA over the weekend. Those initial doses — around 76,700 — will also go to long-term care facilities across the commonwealth.In the video player above: Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine arrives in LouisvilleAccording to Gov. Andy Beshear’s office, which has been previewing the distribution for weeks, CVS and Walgreens will help administer the shots at the senior living centers.Representatives from CVS said its pharmacy teams will administer the Pfizer vaccines to 12 states this week, including Kentucky. Company officials said they expect the majority of residents and staff to be fully vaccinated within three to four weeks after the first visit.The governor spoke Monday about the latest distribution phase, underscoring the importance of the vaccines in dealing a “real blow” to COVID-19.Beshear’s goal is to get much of the state’s long-term care residents vaccinated by mid-March. That would help Kentucky get through a good portion of its first phase of those who are set to receive the vaccine, including those who work in health care.Landmark of Louisville, another senior living center, also administered the shots Monday.Beshear said more than two-thirds of the state’s deaths come from long-term care facilities. He also said that by vaccinating this population early, the state can safeguard its hospital capacity, which has seen upticks due to the surge that preceded Thanksgiving. John More, chairman and CEO of Atria Senior Living, spoke about the importance of the COVID-19 vaccine not just for residents, but also for the staff who have been caring for the seniors, who are most at risk for serious complications from COVID-19.Ahead of the first vaccinations, More thanked Beshear’s administration for spearheading plans to quickly get vaccines to senior living centers in Kentucky.The Moderna vaccine began its journey across the country Sunday after shipments left UPS in Louisville. This is the second COVID-19 vaccine to be distributed in the United States. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines were shipped out a week ago.Officials say the Moderna vaccine and the Pfizer shot requires two doses several weeks apart. The second dose must be administered from the same place as the first.More said residents and staff who received the COVID-19 vaccine Monday will then get their second dose on Jan. 11. He said virtually all residents have signed consent forms and those who missed the clinic Monday will then get a chance to get their first dose on Jan. 11.More called Monday’s vaccine distribution a light at the end of the tunnel. He said the Louisville facility, much like the other Atria communities across the country, have been waiting on the vaccine since news began going out that they would be ready for distribution.Kentucky hospitals will also be receiving doses of the Moderna vaccine, a week after the first Pfizer vaccines began going out to the first hospital systems across the commonwealth.Beshear said the state will have to wait until the long-term care residents receive their second dose before senior living center restrictions can be lifted.

The first seniors in Kentucky have begun receiving COVID-19 vaccines.

The vaccines, from Pfizer, were administered Monday morning at Atria Springdale in Louisville. The senior living community is part of the larger Atria Senior Living network across the country.

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Distribution of the vaccine comes after the second COVID-19 vaccine, from Moderna, was approved by the FDA over the weekend. Those initial doses — around 76,700 — will also go to long-term care facilities across the commonwealth.

In the video player above: Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine arrives in Louisville

According to Gov. Andy Beshear’s office, which has been previewing the distribution for weeks, CVS and Walgreens will help administer the shots at the senior living centers.

Representatives from CVS said its pharmacy teams will administer the Pfizer vaccines to 12 states this week, including Kentucky. Company officials said they expect the majority of residents and staff to be fully vaccinated within three to four weeks after the first visit.

The governor spoke Monday about the latest distribution phase, underscoring the importance of the vaccines in dealing a “real blow” to COVID-19.

Beshear’s goal is to get much of the state’s long-term care residents vaccinated by mid-March. That would help Kentucky get through a good portion of its first phase of those who are set to receive the vaccine, including those who work in health care.

Landmark of Louisville, another senior living center, also administered the shots Monday.

Beshear said more than two-thirds of the state’s deaths come from long-term care facilities. He also said that by vaccinating this population early, the state can safeguard its hospital capacity, which has seen upticks due to the surge that preceded Thanksgiving.

John More, chairman and CEO of Atria Senior Living, spoke about the importance of the COVID-19 vaccine not just for residents, but also for the staff who have been caring for the seniors, who are most at risk for serious complications from COVID-19.

Ahead of the first vaccinations, More thanked Beshear’s administration for spearheading plans to quickly get vaccines to senior living centers in Kentucky.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

The Moderna vaccine began its journey across the country Sunday after shipments left UPS in Louisville. This is the second COVID-19 vaccine to be distributed in the United States. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines were shipped out a week ago.

Officials say the Moderna vaccine and the Pfizer shot requires two doses several weeks apart. The second dose must be administered from the same place as the first.

More said residents and staff who received the COVID-19 vaccine Monday will then get their second dose on Jan. 11. He said virtually all residents have signed consent forms and those who missed the clinic Monday will then get a chance to get their first dose on Jan. 11.

More called Monday’s vaccine distribution a light at the end of the tunnel. He said the Louisville facility, much like the other Atria communities across the country, have been waiting on the vaccine since news began going out that they would be ready for distribution.

Kentucky hospitals will also be receiving doses of the Moderna vaccine, a week after the first Pfizer vaccines began going out to the first hospital systems across the commonwealth.

Beshear said the state will have to wait until the long-term care residents receive their second dose before senior living center restrictions can be lifted.

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