The interim chief of the Louisville Metro Police Department, who is set to retire in just a few days, spent more than four hours testifying in front of a Metro Council committee on Monday.Council members are investigating the city’s handling of the Breonna Taylor case, the death of David McAtee and on-going protests.The Government Oversight and Audit Committee previously issued a subpoena for Chief Rob Schroeder, who has been heading the department since Steve Conrad was fired, to testify. He filed an appeal, but it was denied early Monday.A judge ordered Schroeder to appear before the Metro Council committee, otherwise he will be held in contempt. He appeared on Monday and started with an opening statement saying that his role was sudden, and he had to learn it during one of “the most challenging times imaginable.”Watch the full testimony below, and a recap in the player above:He began with clarifying why he was not able to testify in open session, and said that he was always willing to meet in executive session.Schroeder and Chief of Public Safety Amy Hess walked out of a committee hearing in August when they were called to testify. That action ultimately forced the Metro Council to have a judge intervene. Monday’s testimony didn’t provide any new bombshell revelations, but it did give the council a more clear picture of the relationship between Mayor Greg Fischer, Chief Schroeder and the department.”Certainly there were times over this when yes I have felt micromanaged,” Schroeder said.Schroeder said trust had eroded between the mayor and the department following an LMPD Facebook post of an incident in August with protesters at 4th Street Live.”In a meeting Mayor Fischer had asked me if we had doctored that video. To which I told him of course not. He replied to me that he was having difficulty trusting the police at that point,” Schroeder said.The council also questioned whether the mayor or anyone else gave a stand down order the night of May 29 when several downtown businesses were damaged and looted. Something Schroeder denied.”We were simply overwhelmed. Orders or not there is no way we would have willingly lost the city,” Schroeder said.Metro Council President David James asked Schroeder about some of the more recent incidents, including the arrest of State Representative Attica Scott during a protest last week.James also asked the chief to clarify whether they ever sought a warrant to gain access to protesters at First Unitarian Church after curfew.”That is a conversation Chief Hess and I and some other members of the staff had with a member of the county attorney and determined that was not an appropriate course of action,” Schroeder said.Schroeder largely dodged questions specifically regarding the Breonna Taylor case because of ongoing investigations.During testimony, Schroeder confirmed there are currently 20 active Professional Standards Unit investigations and five Public Integrity Unit investigations related to LMPD’s protest response.Yvette Gentry is set to replace Schroeder as interim chief on Thursday. WLKY’s Drew Gardner will have more on this story tonight.

The interim chief of the Louisville Metro Police Department, who is set to retire in just a few days, spent more than four hours testifying in front of a Metro Council committee on Monday.

Council members are investigating the city’s handling of the Breonna Taylor case, the death of David McAtee and on-going protests.

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The Government Oversight and Audit Committee previously issued a subpoena for Chief Rob Schroeder, who has been heading the department since Steve Conrad was fired, to testify. He filed an appeal, but it was denied early Monday.

A judge ordered Schroeder to appear before the Metro Council committee, otherwise he will be held in contempt. He appeared on Monday and started with an opening statement saying that his role was sudden, and he had to learn it during one of “the most challenging times imaginable.”

Watch the full testimony below, and a recap in the player above:

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He began with clarifying why he was not able to testify in open session, and said that he was always willing to meet in executive session.

Schroeder and Chief of Public Safety Amy Hess walked out of a committee hearing in August when they were called to testify. That action ultimately forced the Metro Council to have a judge intervene.

Monday’s testimony didn’t provide any new bombshell revelations, but it did give the council a more clear picture of the relationship between Mayor Greg Fischer, Chief Schroeder and the department.

“Certainly there were times over this when yes I have felt micromanaged,” Schroeder said.

Schroeder said trust had eroded between the mayor and the department following an LMPD Facebook post of an incident in August with protesters at 4th Street Live.

“In a meeting Mayor Fischer had asked me if we had doctored that video. To which I told him of course not. He replied to me that he was having difficulty trusting the police at that point,” Schroeder said.

The council also questioned whether the mayor or anyone else gave a stand down order the night of May 29 when several downtown businesses were damaged and looted. Something Schroeder denied.

“We were simply overwhelmed. Orders or not there is no way we would have willingly lost the city,” Schroeder said.

Metro Council President David James asked Schroeder about some of the more recent incidents, including the arrest of State Representative Attica Scott during a protest last week.

James also asked the chief to clarify whether they ever sought a warrant to gain access to protesters at First Unitarian Church after curfew.

“That is a conversation Chief Hess and I and some other members of the staff had with a member of the county attorney and determined that was not an appropriate course of action,” Schroeder said.

Schroeder largely dodged questions specifically regarding the Breonna Taylor case because of ongoing investigations.

During testimony, Schroeder confirmed there are currently 20 active Professional Standards Unit investigations and five Public Integrity Unit investigations related to LMPD’s protest response.

Yvette Gentry is set to replace Schroeder as interim chief on Thursday.

WLKY’s Drew Gardner will have more on this story tonight.

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