The story begins almost eight years ago in northeast France.A young man named Kevin Grenot was in a lush field with a metal detector trying to see what he could find buried in the ground. He was compelled to look in this spot because his grandfather used to tell him World War II stories which occurred in this very field. As a result of his upbringing, Grenot has always had great admiration and respect for U.S. service members.During his search, he ended up finding a bracelet buried deep in the ground with the inscription “M.G. Phillips” and some numbers beneath it. After doing some research, he determined it belonged to someone from the U.S. military.”It was really hard to find Mr. Phillips,” Grenot says. He held onto the bracelet for years, hoping one day to return it to its rightful owner, but hitting one dead end after another. Then in January of this year, he made contact with professional genealogist Megan Heyl, who lives more than 4,000 miles away in Holland, Michigan.”He (Kevin) was pretty sure that Mr. Phillips had probably been deceased at that time so he was hoping that there was some children,” Heyl says.After a few weeks of working on the project day and night, Heyl found M.G. Phillips’ only living son and called him on the phone.”I couldn’t believe it at first,” said Linvill Phillips, who is 80 years old and from Pilot Mountain, North Carolina. “I was just shocked and I thought, ‘They got the wrong person.’ She said, ‘No, we’ve checked this out. We know who we’ve got!'”So, with the dots connected and Marshall Glenn Phillips’ family finally on his radar, Grenot planned to fly from France to North Carolina to deliver the item personally.”Then COVID hit and the world stopped,” recalls Heyl.International travel was out of the question and everything was shutting down. So in March, they decided the best bet was to have Grenot ship the bracelet to Heyl.”It sat in quarantine in France for almost three months,” she says. “It got shipped to New York. It sat in customs for almost two months.”It didn’t make it to her in Michigan until late August and when it did, there was a huge hole in the cardboard box. Incredibly, the bracelet was still in there along with a letter from Grenot. Now, she plans to drive more than 700 miles to deliver the bracelet to Phillips, in person.”You know, it took eight years for this artifact to find American soil but eight years in terms of history, it’s nothing,” Grenot says.”I can’t believe that anybody went to the trouble that they’ve gone to, to get that thing to me. And, you know, I just can’t believe it. When I think about it, it’s like a dream,” Phillips says. The Phillips family has a long history of proud service. Marshall’s brother was also in the Army, Linvill served in the Navy and so did his brother.Marshall returned home from World War II but passed away in 1986.

The story begins almost eight years ago in northeast France.

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A young man named Kevin Grenot was in a lush field with a metal detector trying to see what he could find buried in the ground. He was compelled to look in this spot because his grandfather used to tell him World War II stories which occurred in this very field. As a result of his upbringing, Grenot has always had great admiration and respect for U.S. service members.

During his search, he ended up finding a bracelet buried deep in the ground with the inscription “M.G. Phillips” and some numbers beneath it. After doing some research, he determined it belonged to someone from the U.S. military.

“It was really hard to find Mr. Phillips,” Grenot says.

He held onto the bracelet for years, hoping one day to return it to its rightful owner, but hitting one dead end after another. Then in January of this year, he made contact with professional genealogist Megan Heyl, who lives more than 4,000 miles away in Holland, Michigan.

“He (Kevin) was pretty sure that Mr. Phillips had probably been deceased at that time so he was hoping that there was some children,” Heyl says.

After a few weeks of working on the project day and night, Heyl found M.G. Phillips’ only living son and called him on the phone.

“I couldn’t believe it at first,” said Linvill Phillips, who is 80 years old and from Pilot Mountain, North Carolina. “I was just shocked and I thought, ‘They got the wrong person.’ She said, ‘No, we’ve checked this out. We know who we’ve got!'”

So, with the dots connected and Marshall Glenn Phillips’ family finally on his radar, Grenot planned to fly from France to North Carolina to deliver the item personally.

“Then COVID hit and the world stopped,” recalls Heyl.

International travel was out of the question and everything was shutting down. So in March, they decided the best bet was to have Grenot ship the bracelet to Heyl.

“It sat in quarantine in France for almost three months,” she says. “It got shipped to New York. It sat in customs for almost two months.”

It didn’t make it to her in Michigan until late August and when it did, there was a huge hole in the cardboard box. Incredibly, the bracelet was still in there along with a letter from Grenot. Now, she plans to drive more than 700 miles to deliver the bracelet to Phillips, in person.

“You know, it took eight years for this artifact to find American soil but eight years in terms of history, it’s nothing,” Grenot says.

“I can’t believe that anybody went to the trouble that they’ve gone to, to get that thing to me. And, you know, I just can’t believe it. When I think about it, it’s like a dream,” Phillips says.

The Phillips family has a long history of proud service. Marshall’s brother was also in the Army, Linvill served in the Navy and so did his brother.

Marshall returned home from World War II but passed away in 1986.

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