Kentucky’s governor announced his signing and vetoing of several bills.Several of the bills he said he’ll sign were related to health care. Gov. Andy Beshear said he’ll approve House Bill 95, a bipartisan bill that caps the price of insulin to $30 for a 30-day supply.”For too long, too many Kentuckians with diabetes have struggled to afford this life-preserving and in many cases, life-saving medication,” said Beshear.But Beshear said several bills that made it to his desk, which he vetoed, were “politically motivated” and “violate the Constitution.”Among those he mentioned were Senate Bill 228, which was passed along party lines. Under current law, the governor chooses a replacement for a U.S. Senate seat if someone steps down. This bill would require the governor to pick a candidate chosen by the leaders of the outgoing senator’s political party.”Once we start changing laws and authority based on the people who get elected, we have an imbalance system that does not provide the type of consistency that our people, our businesses and everyone deserves,” Beshear said.U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, who voiced his support for the measure, declined to comment on the veto, and instead pointed to the senator’s previous comments on the measure. McConnell has said the bill would improve how a vacancy would be filled.Republicans wield supermajorities in Kentucky’s legislature, giving them the votes to brush aside the veto. Lawmakers will reconvene later this month for the final two days of this year’s session.Speaker David Osborne issued the following statement after hearing news of vetoes issued by Beshear: The Governor’s decision to issue these vetoes comes as no surprise and only serves as further evidence that he has no intention of working with anyone who may differ in opinion. Instead, it is clear he plans to continue dictating inconsistent and arbitrary policies from behind a desk in the Capitol. The executive branch is just one of our state’s three branches of government, and each possesses a specific responsibility and corresponding authority. In the midst of a global pandemic, Kentuckians sent supermajorities to represent them in the House and Senate. They sent us here to enact good long-term public policy, restore common sense to our state government, and serve as a check to his attempts to unilaterally decide the will of the people. We fully intend to continue doing so. The governor said he’ll evaluate his options on whether to take the matter in front of a judge if lawmakers choose to override his veto.He also vetoed House Bill 275 and House Bill 518.The veto break began last Wednesday. Kentucky’s legislative session adjourns on March 30.

Kentucky’s governor announced his signing and vetoing of several bills.

Several of the bills he said he’ll sign were related to health care. Gov. Andy Beshear said he’ll approve House Bill 95, a bipartisan bill that caps the price of insulin to $30 for a 30-day supply.

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“For too long, too many Kentuckians with diabetes have struggled to afford this life-preserving and in many cases, life-saving medication,” said Beshear.

But Beshear said several bills that made it to his desk, which he vetoed, were “politically motivated” and “violate the Constitution.”

Among those he mentioned were Senate Bill 228, which was passed along party lines. Under current law, the governor chooses a replacement for a U.S. Senate seat if someone steps down. This bill would require the governor to pick a candidate chosen by the leaders of the outgoing senator’s political party.

“Once we start changing laws and authority based on the people who get elected, we have an imbalance system that does not provide the type of consistency that our people, our businesses and everyone deserves,” Beshear said.

U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, who voiced his support for the measure, declined to comment on the veto, and instead pointed to the senator’s previous comments on the measure. McConnell has said the bill would improve how a vacancy would be filled.

Republicans wield supermajorities in Kentucky’s legislature, giving them the votes to brush aside the veto. Lawmakers will reconvene later this month for the final two days of this year’s session.

Speaker David Osborne issued the following statement after hearing news of vetoes issued by Beshear:

The Governor’s decision to issue these vetoes comes as no surprise and only serves as further evidence that he has no intention of working with anyone who may differ in opinion. Instead, it is clear he plans to continue dictating inconsistent and arbitrary policies from behind a desk in the Capitol. The executive branch is just one of our state’s three branches of government, and each possesses a specific responsibility and corresponding authority. In the midst of a global pandemic, Kentuckians sent supermajorities to represent them in the House and Senate. They sent us here to enact good long-term public policy, restore common sense to our state government, and serve as a check to his attempts to unilaterally decide the will of the people. We fully intend to continue doing so.

The governor said he’ll evaluate his options on whether to take the matter in front of a judge if lawmakers choose to override his veto.

He also vetoed House Bill 275 and House Bill 518.

The veto break began last Wednesday. Kentucky’s legislative session adjourns on March 30.

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