Black chefs in Louisville are hoping to reach new customers as the city celebrates its first-ever 502 Black Eats Week, an addition to the 3-year old Black Business week that happens in June.Each visit at one of the 29 eateries being showcased will earn both customers and restaurants a chance to win prizes, according to the event founder Tiandra Robinson.“I like to tell people that Black-owned doesn’t mean Black only,” Robinson said.”Everyone’s tastebuds are invited to explore the “hidden gems” of Louisville’s foodie scene,” said Robinson.“It’s important that we leave some type of legacy and it’s important that we create generational wealth for our (Black) families and a lot of us are doing that through owning businesses,” she told WLKY News on Monday. “That way, we have something to pass down to our kids, grandkids and great grandkids.”Gary Posey’s restaurant, Po-Z’s Kitchen, opened in the Dixie Manor Shopping Center in March. At that same time, the U.S. began grappling with the coronavirus pandemic and restaurants, like many businesses, were hit hard economically.Marketing also suffered.”You get a lot of people who don’t know you exist,” Posey told WLKY’s Marvis Herring on Monday. “There’s been plenty of people that’s walked past and they was like I didn’t even know you were here.”He told WLKY News he’s thankful for the extra exposure his “soul food/bar food” restaurant is expected to receive thanks to the inaugural 502 Black Eats Week. Just like Posey, budding entrepreneur Britanny Cummings launched her virtual eatery Witchin’ Pizza in March, too.“What you can expect is pizza, just in the sandwich form, “ explained Cummings.Customers pre-order the sandwiches and then pick them up. On certain days, the company delivers the food.Coronavirus closures threw off her original business plans. “You just keep going you don’t give up,” she said optimistically.Cummings’ creations were something she used to make her now-14-year old son. She hopes it continues blossoming into much more, for his sake and for the sake of her future family members.“We’re trying to build things for our kids,” said Cummings. “My driving force is being able to have a job that my son can come into that’s in our family for his first job.”It’s called 502 Black Eats Week, explained Robinson, because she didn’t want to limit it to only brick and mortar restaurants. Caterers, food trucks, coffee shops and one-man shops are also included.Here is a full list of 502 Black Eats Week participants:For details on how to win prizes, click here.

Black chefs in Louisville are hoping to reach new customers as the city celebrates its first-ever 502 Black Eats Week, an addition to the 3-year old Black Business week that happens in June.

Each visit at one of the 29 eateries being showcased will earn both customers and restaurants a chance to win prizes, according to the event founder Tiandra Robinson.

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“I like to tell people that Black-owned doesn’t mean Black only,” Robinson said.

“Everyone’s tastebuds are invited to explore the “hidden gems” of Louisville’s foodie scene,” said Robinson.

“It’s important that we leave some type of legacy and it’s important that we create generational wealth for our (Black) families and a lot of us are doing that through owning businesses,” she told WLKY News on Monday. “That way, we have something to pass down to our kids, grandkids and great grandkids.”

Gary Posey’s restaurant, Po-Z’s Kitchen, opened in the Dixie Manor Shopping Center in March. At that same time, the U.S. began grappling with the coronavirus pandemic and restaurants, like many businesses, were hit hard economically.

Marketing also suffered.

“You get a lot of people who don’t know you exist,” Posey told WLKY’s Marvis Herring on Monday. “There’s been plenty of people that’s walked past and they was like I didn’t even know you were here.”

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

He told WLKY News he’s thankful for the extra exposure his “soul food/bar food” restaurant is expected to receive thanks to the inaugural 502 Black Eats Week.

Just like Posey, budding entrepreneur Britanny Cummings launched her virtual eatery Witchin’ Pizza in March, too.

“What you can expect is pizza, just in the sandwich form, “ explained Cummings.

This content is imported from Facebook. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Customers pre-order the sandwiches and then pick them up. On certain days, the company delivers the food.

Coronavirus closures threw off her original business plans.

“You just keep going you don’t give up,” she said optimistically.

Cummings’ creations were something she used to make her now-14-year old son. She hopes it continues blossoming into much more, for his sake and for the sake of her future family members.

“We’re trying to build things for our kids,” said Cummings. “My driving force is being able to have a job that my son can come into that’s in our family for his first job.”

It’s called 502 Black Eats Week, explained Robinson, because she didn’t want to limit it to only brick and mortar restaurants.

Caterers, food trucks, coffee shops and one-man shops are also included.

Here is a full list of 502 Black Eats Week participants:

502 Black Eats Week Louisville WLKY

Tiandra Robinson

Full list of 502 Black Eats Week participants

For details on how to win prizes, click here.

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