This is not your average Kentucky Derby, folks. But what is these days? The biggest and most noticeable change to the 146th Run for the Roses is the absence of fans, meaning the city’s biggest and most lavish event can only be viewed on TV. No packed infields, no celebrity guests.So here’s what you need to know about the most unusual Derby in history. We’ll start with the basics.When, where and how to watchThe Derby takes place each year at Churchill Downs on the first Saturday of May. This year’s race was postponed to Saturday, Sept. 5. There are multiple races ahead of the Derby, but post time for the main event is 7:01 p.m.The Derby is broadcast on NBC. Kentucky Oaks, on Friday, will air on NBCSN.How to make your betIt’s not quite the same experience as going up to the window, but you can still place wagers online: Click here to place your bet. Who to put your money on Tiz The Law is considered the favorite in this year’s Run for the Roses with 1-1 odds. Many Derby experts are sticking with him for their winner prediction. In total, 16 horses will run. Two scratched before race day, King Guillermo and Finnick the Fierce, and Art Collector dropped out before the field was set. Post positions, odds Important traffic notesWhile traffic isn’t expected to be as heavy without droves of fans moving into the area, LMPD is closing or restricting access to some streets due to protests, saying they need some clearance for neighbors and first responders.The biggest closure is Central Avenue from Third Street to Taylor Boulevard. No civilian pedestrians or vehicles will be allowed through. Click here for traffic changesWeather forecastOf course, the weather for Derby looks glorious. It’s great for the horses, but somewhat sad for fans who endured rain for the last two.Read the forecast here Coronavirus changesBesides the lack of fans, there will be some other noticeable differences to the Derby this year. Due to the coronavirus, Gov. Andy Beshear will not deliver the winner’s trophy live in-person. Instead, he intends to play a video. He won’t be at the race. Also, Churchill Downs has decided to modify the tradition of playing the state song, “My Old Kentucky Home,” before the Derby due to its ties to slavery. Read more about that change here.What we know about protestsThere might not be spectators at Derby, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be crowds at Churchill Downs. LMPD has made contact with several groups expected to hold demonstrations on Derby Day. That includes the NFAC, Until Freedom and Three Percenters. Officials said they’ll have officers around the area, including National Guard members.Until Freedom and other various groups intend to demonstrate beginning at 4:30 p.m. NFAC’s protest is planned for the morning.What about the galas?The Barnstable Brown, Trifecta and Unbridled Eve galas, all star-studded events during Derby time, were canceled.

This is not your average Kentucky Derby, folks. But what is these days?

The biggest and most noticeable change to the 146th Run for the Roses is the absence of fans, meaning the city’s biggest and most lavish event can only be viewed on TV. No packed infields, no celebrity guests.

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So here’s what you need to know about the most unusual Derby in history. We’ll start with the basics.

When, where and how to watch

The Derby takes place each year at Churchill Downs on the first Saturday of May. This year’s race was postponed to Saturday, Sept. 5. There are multiple races ahead of the Derby, but post time for the main event is 7:01 p.m.

The Derby is broadcast on NBC. Kentucky Oaks, on Friday, will air on NBCSN.

How to make your bet

It’s not quite the same experience as going up to the window, but you can still place wagers online: Click here to place your bet.

Who to put your money on

Tiz The Law is considered the favorite in this year’s Run for the Roses with 1-1 odds. Many Derby experts are sticking with him for their winner prediction. In total, 16 horses will run. Two scratched before race day, King Guillermo and Finnick the Fierce, and Art Collector dropped out before the field was set.

Important traffic notes

While traffic isn’t expected to be as heavy without droves of fans moving into the area, LMPD is closing or restricting access to some streets due to protests, saying they need some clearance for neighbors and first responders.

The biggest closure is Central Avenue from Third Street to Taylor Boulevard. No civilian pedestrians or vehicles will be allowed through.

Weather forecast

Of course, the weather for Derby looks glorious. It’s great for the horses, but somewhat sad for fans who endured rain for the last two.

Coronavirus changes

Besides the lack of fans, there will be some other noticeable differences to the Derby this year. Due to the coronavirus, Gov. Andy Beshear will not deliver the winner’s trophy live in-person. Instead, he intends to play a video. He won’t be at the race. Also, Churchill Downs has decided to modify the tradition of playing the state song, “My Old Kentucky Home,” before the Derby due to its ties to slavery. Read more about that change here.

What we know about protests

There might not be spectators at Derby, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be crowds at Churchill Downs. LMPD has made contact with several groups expected to hold demonstrations on Derby Day. That includes the NFAC, Until Freedom and Three Percenters. Officials said they’ll have officers around the area, including National Guard members.

Until Freedom and other various groups intend to demonstrate beginning at 4:30 p.m. NFAC’s protest is planned for the morning.

What about the galas?

The Barnstable Brown, Trifecta and Unbridled Eve galas, all star-studded events during Derby time, were canceled.

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