Doctors say they are seeing a rise in exercise-related injuries due to the pandemic. In short, people who haven’t worked out for months are jumping right back into it and hurting themselves.Bob Tetz, who lives in East Sacramento, California, said he gained 20 pounds during the pandemic. When he tried getting back into a routine, he instead ended up at the UC Davis Health Sports Medicine program.”I used to be so into daily workouts — sometimes twice a day workouts — that I maybe overdid it a little bit,” Tetz said.Dr. Brandee Waite with UC Davis Health said the increase of workout injuries during the pandemic come from people like Tetz wanting to work off some weight. However, while the timespan from before lockdowns were issued and to when people began resuming working varies from person to person, the common thread is that it’s been a while for many people.”If they go back to doing exactly what they were trying to do before the pandemic, it’s an increased risk for injury,” Waite said.Many of the common injuries Waite has seen include shoulders, knees, Achilles and back strains. The increase in injuries has kept UC Davis Health busy, the doctor said.Waite recommends to those wanting to get back into a workout routine to start easier, starting with about 25 to 50% of the intensity or duration of what you were doing before you stopped being active.If you feel any sort of tweak in your body, Waite also suggests to stop and rest and not push yourself.For Tetz, he is now slowly rehabbing by doing a lot of hot yoga.”COVID was a problem and it disrupted everything,” Tetz said. “If you haven’t exercised in a long time, you do need to take it slow.”

Doctors say they are seeing a rise in exercise-related injuries due to the pandemic. In short, people who haven’t worked out for months are jumping right back into it and hurting themselves.

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Bob Tetz, who lives in East Sacramento, California, said he gained 20 pounds during the pandemic. When he tried getting back into a routine, he instead ended up at the UC Davis Health Sports Medicine program.

“I used to be so into daily workouts — sometimes twice a day workouts — that I maybe overdid it a little bit,” Tetz said.

Dr. Brandee Waite with UC Davis Health said the increase of workout injuries during the pandemic come from people like Tetz wanting to work off some weight. However, while the timespan from before lockdowns were issued and to when people began resuming working varies from person to person, the common thread is that it’s been a while for many people.

“If they go back to doing exactly what they were trying to do before the pandemic, it’s an increased risk for injury,” Waite said.

Many of the common injuries Waite has seen include shoulders, knees, Achilles and back strains. The increase in injuries has kept UC Davis Health busy, the doctor said.

Waite recommends to those wanting to get back into a workout routine to start easier, starting with about 25 to 50% of the intensity or duration of what you were doing before you stopped being active.

If you feel any sort of tweak in your body, Waite also suggests to stop and rest and not push yourself.

For Tetz, he is now slowly rehabbing by doing a lot of hot yoga.

“COVID was a problem and it disrupted everything,” Tetz said. “If you haven’t exercised in a long time, you do need to take it slow.”

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