Gov. Andy Beshear filed a lengthy response with the state House of Representatives addressing the complaints by Kentuckians who filed an impeachment petition against him.The governor had until last Friday to officially submit a response to the petition, an effort that triggered the creation of a special House committee as required by state law. His response was made public after Wednesday’s committee meeting.The lengthy response delves into his arguments against those seeking his impeachment and why he is asking the committee to dismiss the petition.Beshear’s legal counsel started out by addressing the criticisms the governor has received from residents and lawmakers about his decisions throughout the pandemic, including the executive orders he’s issued to curb the spread of the coronavirus.”He is aware that not everyone agrees with his decisions; no governor can ever hope to have unanimity with regard to his decisions. And he is aware that his actions in managing the pandemic could have consequences at the ballot box. That is the way our Constitution is framed; the chief executive manages the executive branch of government, and the people decide if they agree at the next election.”Ultimately, Beshear’s legal team said the governor acted by taking “decisive action to address the ever-shifting target presented by the previously unknown — and now mutating — virus.”The petition was submitted by four Kentuckians upset with Beshear’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. One such mandate that remains in place requires Kentuckians to wear face masks in public settings, and in bars or restaurants when they are not actively eating or drinking.Others, including Kentucky lawmakers, have called the measures damaging to businesses already hit hard by the pandemic. Republicans in the supermajority worked quickly to move a series of bills that sought to limit the governor’s executive powers.Beshear vetoed those bills earlier this week, calling them unconstitutional.With lawmakers on break, the committee that was set up to hear the arguments in the impeachment petition has sought to finish its work before the end of the month.In his more than 200 page response, Beshear turned his focus to the petitioners, whom he said were unhappy with a recent state Supreme Court ruling that the governor was within his bounds to issue the executive orders.”They lost. Unhappy with their losses, the petitioners admit they filed the petition because of this failing, stating, ‘They felt the Kentucky Supreme Court allowed Beshear to do anything he wants,'” Beshear’s counsel wrote.According to Beshear’s response, the petition is neither backed up by facts or laws and classifies it as a “last-ditch effort to upend our constitutional separation of powers.”The rest of Beshear’s response delves into how the governor initially responded to the pandemic, how he managed recent surges (including his use of executive orders), and then into the backgrounds of the petitioners whom he has spoken about publicly.The governor has said two of the petitioners — Jacob Clark of Grayson County and Tony Wheatley of Mercer County — have been critical of Beshear in the past, going as far as making violent posts on social media and trying to scare him and his family.Wheatley, Beshear said, is behind a rally during Memorial Day weekend at the Kentucky Capitol that saw attendees hang an effigy of the governor from a tree.On Wednesday, it was learned another one of the petitioners now wants himself removed from the effort after discussions with his attorney. According to the letter, the attorney explained to his client that “impeachment is not a proper response when public officials make policy decisions with which a citizen disagrees.”Related: Attorney says Kentuckian wants himself removed from Gov. Beshear impeachment petitionBeshear’s legal counsel also delves into the process of impeachment, and how it works within Kentucky’s Constitution to determine if this most recent petition has a legal standing.The full response can be viewed here.The petitioners has until Tuesday to file a response to Beshear’s that he filed last week. The petitioners’ response is more than 200 pages long and can be viewed here.During Wednesday’s meeting, the committee took no significant steps. They instead are asking the governor for additional information, but the group did not elaborate what other details they are looking for from Beshear.Click here to read more about the committee’s deadlines.

Gov. Andy Beshear filed a lengthy response with the state House of Representatives addressing the complaints by Kentuckians who filed an impeachment petition against him.

The governor had until last Friday to officially submit a response to the petition, an effort that triggered the creation of a special House committee as required by state law. His response was made public after Wednesday’s committee meeting.

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The lengthy response delves into his arguments against those seeking his impeachment and why he is asking the committee to dismiss the petition.

Beshear’s legal counsel started out by addressing the criticisms the governor has received from residents and lawmakers about his decisions throughout the pandemic, including the executive orders he’s issued to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

“He is aware that not everyone agrees with his decisions; no governor can ever hope to have unanimity with regard to his decisions. And he is aware that his actions in managing the pandemic could have consequences at the ballot box. That is the way our Constitution is framed; the chief executive manages the executive branch of government, and the people decide if they agree at the next election.”

Ultimately, Beshear’s legal team said the governor acted by taking “decisive action to address the ever-shifting target presented by the previously unknown — and now mutating — virus.”

The petition was submitted by four Kentuckians upset with Beshear’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. One such mandate that remains in place requires Kentuckians to wear face masks in public settings, and in bars or restaurants when they are not actively eating or drinking.

Others, including Kentucky lawmakers, have called the measures damaging to businesses already hit hard by the pandemic. Republicans in the supermajority worked quickly to move a series of bills that sought to limit the governor’s executive powers.

Beshear vetoed those bills earlier this week, calling them unconstitutional.

With lawmakers on break, the committee that was set up to hear the arguments in the impeachment petition has sought to finish its work before the end of the month.

In his more than 200 page response, Beshear turned his focus to the petitioners, whom he said were unhappy with a recent state Supreme Court ruling that the governor was within his bounds to issue the executive orders.

“They lost. Unhappy with their losses, the petitioners admit they filed the petition because of this failing, stating, ‘They felt the Kentucky Supreme Court allowed Beshear to do anything he wants,'” Beshear’s counsel wrote.

According to Beshear’s response, the petition is neither backed up by facts or laws and classifies it as a “last-ditch effort to upend our constitutional separation of powers.”

The rest of Beshear’s response delves into how the governor initially responded to the pandemic, how he managed recent surges (including his use of executive orders), and then into the backgrounds of the petitioners whom he has spoken about publicly.

The governor has said two of the petitioners — Jacob Clark of Grayson County and Tony Wheatley of Mercer County — have been critical of Beshear in the past, going as far as making violent posts on social media and trying to scare him and his family.

Wheatley, Beshear said, is behind a rally during Memorial Day weekend at the Kentucky Capitol that saw attendees hang an effigy of the governor from a tree.

On Wednesday, it was learned another one of the petitioners now wants himself removed from the effort after discussions with his attorney. According to the letter, the attorney explained to his client that “impeachment is not a proper response when public officials make policy decisions with which a citizen disagrees.”

Related: Attorney says Kentuckian wants himself removed from Gov. Beshear impeachment petition

Beshear’s legal counsel also delves into the process of impeachment, and how it works within Kentucky’s Constitution to determine if this most recent petition has a legal standing.

The full response can be viewed here.

The petitioners has until Tuesday to file a response to Beshear’s that he filed last week. The petitioners’ response is more than 200 pages long and can be viewed here.

During Wednesday’s meeting, the committee took no significant steps. They instead are asking the governor for additional information, but the group did not elaborate what other details they are looking for from Beshear.

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Click here to read more about the committee’s deadlines.

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