A Bardstown firefighter was honored Wednesday morning after he saved a woman’s life last month. City leaders and members of the Bardstown Fire Department were on hand as Capt. Trevor Mattingly received an award of heroism.Judy Combs was driving home on Highway 49 from work during heavy rain on June 29. She was near the Avon Fogle Bridge when she unknowingly drove into standing water and her car became stuck. After calling 911 from her backseat, Capt. Mattingly arrived on scene with a crew and brought her to safety.”Every call we go on is rewarding. That’s the ultimate outcome. Everyone goes home safe, my crew, the people we’re rescuing, the people we’re here to serve and here to protect. That’s our ultimate goal,” Capt. Mattingly said. “It’s always a good feeling and being to actually meet with her today and talk to her today it’s another great feeling knowing she’s doing her day-to-day things just like we do.”Combs cannot swim and said she feared for her life that night before Capt. Mattingly arrived.”I’m extremely grateful. People don’t realize firefighters and EMTs, police, they put their life on the line every day,” she said.Both Combs and Capt. Mattingly hope the story serves as an important reminder to never drive through standing water, regardless of how deep you think it is.

A Bardstown firefighter was honored Wednesday morning after he saved a woman’s life last month. City leaders and members of the Bardstown Fire Department were on hand as Capt. Trevor Mattingly received an award of heroism.

Judy Combs was driving home on Highway 49 from work during heavy rain on June 29. She was near the Avon Fogle Bridge when she unknowingly drove into standing water and her car became stuck. After calling 911 from her backseat, Capt. Mattingly arrived on scene with a crew and brought her to safety.

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“Every call we go on is rewarding. That’s the ultimate outcome. Everyone goes home safe, my crew, the people we’re rescuing, the people we’re here to serve and here to protect. That’s our ultimate goal,” Capt. Mattingly said. “It’s always a good feeling and being to actually meet with her today and talk to her today it’s another great feeling knowing she’s doing her day-to-day things just like we do.”

Combs cannot swim and said she feared for her life that night before Capt. Mattingly arrived.

“I’m extremely grateful. People don’t realize firefighters and EMTs, police, they put their life on the line every day,” she said.

Both Combs and Capt. Mattingly hope the story serves as an important reminder to never drive through standing water, regardless of how deep you think it is.

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