All remaining charges against a Kentucky state representative and more than a dozen others who were arrested during a demonstration have been dropped.State Rep. Attica Scott was among the 18 people who were taken into custody Sept. 24, a day after a decision was made on charges in the Breonna Taylor case. In player above: Watch Scott, protesters leave the courthouse after charges droppedThe District 41 representative said she was trying to join a crowd that had gathered at First Unitarian Church on Fourth Street after the curfew went into effect at 9 p.m. that day. Church leaders had offered it up as a sanctuary so Louisville Metro police officers wouldn’t arrest them.”They (LMPD) claimed we were trying to burn down library which doesn’t make sense because I’ve been fighting for more funding for the libraries and the library is in my district. So, why would I try to burn it down? Makes no sense,” Scott told WLKY News the day after her arrest.Scott and the others, including her daughter, were charged with first-degree rioting — a felony —as well as failure to disperse and unlawful assembly. The latter two charges are misdemeanors.The felony charges were later dropped.Scott, her daughter, Ashanti, and Shameka-Parrish Wright, a local activist with the Bail Project, were all in court Monday where they learned the misdemeanor charges would be dropped, too.There was a small crowd of people yelling “drop the charges” as they entered the courthouse and they were met with cheers as they left.Scott has been active and vocal during the demonstrations in Taylor’s name. In the months following her death, Scott pre-filed a bill called “Breonna’s Law” that would end no-knock warrants in the state.WLKY will update this story.

All remaining charges against a Kentucky state representative and more than a dozen others who were arrested during a demonstration have been dropped.

State Rep. Attica Scott was among the 18 people who were taken into custody Sept. 24, a day after a decision was made on charges in the Breonna Taylor case.

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In player above: Watch Scott, protesters leave the courthouse after charges dropped

The District 41 representative said she was trying to join a crowd that had gathered at First Unitarian Church on Fourth Street after the curfew went into effect at 9 p.m. that day. Church leaders had offered it up as a sanctuary so Louisville Metro police officers wouldn’t arrest them.

“They (LMPD) claimed we were trying to burn down library which doesn’t make sense because I’ve been fighting for more funding for the libraries and the library is in my district. So, why would I try to burn it down? Makes no sense,” Scott told WLKY News the day after her arrest.

Scott and the others, including her daughter, were charged with first-degree rioting — a felony —as well as failure to disperse and unlawful assembly. The latter two charges are misdemeanors.

The felony charges were later dropped.

Scott, her daughter, Ashanti, and Shameka-Parrish Wright, a local activist with the Bail Project, were all in court Monday where they learned the misdemeanor charges would be dropped, too.

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There was a small crowd of people yelling “drop the charges” as they entered the courthouse and they were met with cheers as they left.

Scott has been active and vocal during the demonstrations in Taylor’s name. In the months following her death, Scott pre-filed a bill called “Breonna’s Law” that would end no-knock warrants in the state.

WLKY will update this story.

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