On Monday, events to honor the late Martin Luther King Jr. could be seen across the country, including in Louisville, as dozens gathered for the 49th Annual MLK Day celebration.Many said it’s a day meant to reflect on the lives lost and the changes that lie ahead. However, for the people who attended Louisville’s event, they said, it’s been more than half-a-century since Reverend King died, but the fight for social justice is far from over.“It is really important today than ever before,” said Rev. Charlers Elliot Jr, King Solomon Baptist Church. “We’re are facing something that we ain’t ever faced before.”As the congregation gathered at the corner of 28thand Broadway, Elliot began the day speaking of the violence in the city. He asked the younger generation to realize senseless killing is hurting the community. As the caravan left the Kroger parking lot en-route to King Solomon Baptist Church, the message grew to equality.“The protesters are here they’re representing unity, of all nationalities, not just Black lives matter,” said Shenita Rickman. “I’m tired of hearing that, I want the world to know that God’s lives matter, that means all lives matter.”For 200 days, many Louisville residents have been protesting, calling for social justice reform. For those who went out to the MLK Day celebration, they said, days like that make them remember they will not stop until change is made.“This fight is not over,” said Antonio Brown. “It’s far from over. Martin Luther King Jr. was fighting for years to get justice, it don’t stop now.”Shenita Rickman has been going to the MLK Day celebrations for 30 years. She said this year’s celebration was important as it falls on the heels of a record-breaking year for homicides. She hopes everyone who went to the event walks away with one message, anything is possible as long as we are all together.“We want all of the young people, that was out there protesting, to get into training programs,” said Rickman. “Get into skilled training programs, and get into a position where they can be our next leaders.”The crowd finished its event with a congregation inside the Baptist church.

On Monday, events to honor the late Martin Luther King Jr. could be seen across the country, including in Louisville, as dozens gathered for the 49th Annual MLK Day celebration.

Many said it’s a day meant to reflect on the lives lost and the changes that lie ahead. However, for the people who attended Louisville’s event, they said, it’s been more than half-a-century since Reverend King died, but the fight for social justice is far from over.

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“It is really important today than ever before,” said Rev. Charlers Elliot Jr, King Solomon Baptist Church. “We’re are facing something that we ain’t ever faced before.”

As the congregation gathered at the corner of 28thand Broadway, Elliot began the day speaking of the violence in the city. He asked the younger generation to realize senseless killing is hurting the community. As the caravan left the Kroger parking lot en-route to King Solomon Baptist Church, the message grew to equality.

“The protesters are here they’re representing unity, of all nationalities, not just Black lives matter,” said Shenita Rickman. “I’m tired of hearing that, I want the world to know that God’s lives matter, that means all lives matter.”

For 200 days, many Louisville residents have been protesting, calling for social justice reform. For those who went out to the MLK Day celebration, they said, days like that make them remember they will not stop until change is made.

“This fight is not over,” said Antonio Brown. “It’s far from over. Martin Luther King Jr. was fighting for years to get justice, it don’t stop now.”

Shenita Rickman has been going to the MLK Day celebrations for 30 years. She said this year’s celebration was important as it falls on the heels of a record-breaking year for homicides. She hopes everyone who went to the event walks away with one message, anything is possible as long as we are all together.

“We want all of the young people, that was out there protesting, to get into training programs,” said Rickman. “Get into skilled training programs, and get into a position where they can be our next leaders.”

The crowd finished its event with a congregation inside the Baptist church.

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